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AMECare Service Offerings
Maintenance, Support and Education that delivers ultimate satisfaction and operational confidence for the user

Product and operator performance directly impact your goals and objectives. To ensure maximum product uptime and operator success, Vision Research offers a complete line of service programs, extended warranties and training classes to meet your specific product or operational needs. Our professional, factory trained service engineers and educators will deliver this training and support through a network of service centers, on-line/self-serve content and user community forums that will help you achieve the results you need.


Customer Service – General inquires, technical troubleshooting or ‘how to’ questions? We’re here to help. Our support centers are staffed from 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM Local Time.

  • Professional Repair Services – Fast, accurate and competitively priced repairs for all of your product needs

  • Extended Warranties – Designed to add peace of mind and extend the factory warranty coverage that eliminates unexpected out of pocket expenses

  • Customer Training – Delivered in a Basic and Advanced format designed to get you quickly using our cameras or to explore the depths of our comprehensive feature set 

Loaner Product – Minimizes lost productivity by minimizing project downtime. Should an unexpected camera failure occur, a loaner camera will be dispatched to a customer’s site to restore business continuity while your product is in for servicing

View a list
of AMECare documents available for download

 

Resources

These are external resources not created by Vision Research® and are provided for your convenience. If you know of a resource we should include on this page, please let our webmaster know by using the contact form. Thanks!


Other Resources






Tutorials







Software Downloads
PCC Version v2.8.761.0

This version of PCC was released on October 14, 2016.

This installer will install PCC version 2.8.761.0.  Before running this installer, you might want to make a backup of your Phantom folder. 

Release notes can be found here

Note:  This version of software has an updated 10G driver for those users who are using our UHS (vXXXX) and Cinestation IV products.  If this is the first install of PCC software, the updated 10G driver will be installed as part of the software installation.  If you have a previous version of PCC software already installed on your PC, you will have to manually install the driver.  Please download these instructions to upgrade your 10G driver after you’ve installed PCC v2.8.761.0.

 

Download the Vision Research ph10g driver manual installation instructions.

There are user guides and thorough software documentation available. Just navigate to the “Help” menu section to get started.

We recommend that the computer you use have a Pentium class microprocessor running 1.7 GHz or higher.  The software will install on the following operating systems:

  • Windows 7 (32 & 64 bit)
  • Windows 8.1 (32 & 64 bit)
  • Windows 10 (32 & 62 bit)

We also recommend you have 4GB of memory and at least 80GB of disk space.

A more powerful computer and fast disk drive will deliver faster display and playback speeds as well as shorter save and download times.

Please visit the "Service Alerts" section in the Phantom Zone to view any known issues and work-arounds associated with this software release and current Phantom cameras.  Please provide feedback via the PCC forum in the Phantom Zone at www.phantomhighspeed.com/PhantomZone and visit the "Service Alerts" section to view any known issues and work-arounds associated with this release. 

 

Warning:  This version of software has only been tested with the firmware versions shown in the table below.  It will work with these or later versions.  If your camera model does not appear below, it has not been tested with v2.8.761.0.  You're more than welcome to download the software as it will not damage the camera however please do make sure you can fully acquire, download and playback a test cine using the acquisition parameters you are going to use before you perform an actual test.

Warning:  If you are upgrading from version PCC 1.3.697.0 or lower, Vision Research recommends that you run the Window Uninstall application prior to installing PCC v2.8.761.0.

To check the firmware version of a camera, run your existing version of the Phantom software, connect to and select the camera of interest, go to "Help --> About" in the Phantom software. If your camera does not meet the minimum firmware requirements and you would like a firmware upgrade, please contact VRI Technical Support.

 

Camera

Minimum Firmware-FPGA-Kernel or phFW version to run Phantom v2.8.761.0

V411

797-596255-16140

V611

797-596255-16140

V711

797-596255-16140

V341

797-578252-16140

V641

797-578252-16140

V642

776b-607252-16140

Flex 4K

167360237-1200700-587 or ph-Flex4k-65

v1211

14967-580555-563 or ph-v1211-39

v1212

17557-642628-507 or ph-v1212-59

v1611

16416-580555-563 or ph-v1611-42

v1612

17557-642628-507 or ph-v1612-59

v2011

16416-580555-563 orph-v2011-42

v2012

17557-642628-507 or ph-v2012-59

v2511

16416-580555-563 or ph-v1611-42

v2512

17557-642628-507 or ph-v2512-59

Miro M110

18034-916-587 or ph-m110-62

Miro M120

18034-915-587 or ph-m120-62

Miro M140

18034-915-587 or ph-m140-62

Miro M310

18034-916-587 or ph-m110-62

Miro M320S

18034-921-587 or ph-m320s-62

Miro M340

18034-915-587 or ph-m340-62

Miro LC310

18034-916-587 or ph-lc310-62

Miro LC311

18034-916-587 or ph-lc311-62-1

Miro LC110

18034-916-587 or ph-lc110-62

Miro LC111

18034-916-587 or ph-lc111-62-1

Miro LC121

18034-915-587 or ph-lc121-62-1

Miro LC120

18034-916-587 or ph-lc120-62

Miro LC320s

18034-921-587 or ph-lc320s-62

Miro LC321s

18034-921-587 or ph-lc321s-62-1

Miro R110

18034-916-587 or ph-r110-62

Miro R120

18034-915-587 or ph-r120-62

Miro R310

18034-916-587 or ph-r310-62

Miro R320s

18034-921-587 or ph-r320s-62

Miro R111

18034-916-587 or ph-r111-62

Miro R311

18034-916-587 or ph-r311-62

Miro R121

18034-915-587 or ph-r121-62

Miro R321s

18034-921-587 or ph-r321s-62

Miro R341

18034-915-587 or ph-m341-62

Miro R141

18034-915-587 or ph-m141-62

Miro LAB110

18034-916-587 or ph-lab110-62

Miro LAB120

18034-915-587 or ph-lab120-62

Miro LAB140

18034-915-587 or ph-lab140-62

Miro LAB3a10

18034-915-587 or ph-lab3a10-62

Miro LAB320

18034-915-587 or ph-lab320-62

Miro LAB340

18034-915-587 or ph-lab340-62

Miro C110

19665-759-254 or ph-c110-70

Miro C210

18163-759-254 or ph-c210-63

Miro C210j

18163-759-254 or ph-c210j-63

VEO 340S

20123-164408-193 or ph-veo340s-75

VEO 340L

20123-164408-193 or ph-veo340l-75

VEO 410S

20123-164408-193 or ph-veo410s-75

VEO 410L

20123-164408-193 or ph-veo410l-75

VEO 640S

20340-164412-193 or ph-veo640s-75

VEO 640L

20123-164408-193 or ph-veo640l-75

VEO 710S

20123-164408-193 or ph-veo710s-75

VEO 710L

20123-164408-193 or ph-veo710l-75

HD (Refurb)

797-857066-16092

CineStation

797-50179-160140

CineStation 4

167360237-157-563 or ph-csiv-65

 

 

 

 

PCC-2.8.761.0-Install.zip

Request Download 


Phantom CineViewer v2.8.761.0

This software was released on October 14, 2016.

The download is 137MB.

This software allows you to view Phantom Cine files and can be used as a demo of standard Phantom software. You can convert cine files to other file formats. And, you can also do image processing.

*Please note* This software is only supported on the following operating systems:
 

  • Windows 7 (32 & 64 bit)
  • Windows 8.1 (32 & 64 bit)
  • Windows 10 (32 & 62 bit)

If you need help with installation or have other questions about this software, please email questions to:support@visionresearch.com and we'll get back to you.

 

CV-2.8.761.0-Install.zip

Download Now 


Frequently Asked Questions Collapse All

Phantom Miro N5 Collapse
Can the Miro N5 accept C-mount lenses?

The Miro N5 was designed to fit into small places, and a C-mount lens would be bigger than the whole camera! So to keep it as small as possible, we opted to use small S-mount lenses (also called M-12-mount lenses). A number of these are available on our Phantom On-Line store.

Do I have to use the Miro N5 I bought with the Miro N-JB base I bought with it?

No, all of the parts of the Miro N-Series system are interchangeable. So, you can use any Miro N5 Head with any Miro N-JB base.

I see the Miro N5 has a serial number. Can it be sent in for repair?

Yes, the Miro N5 can be repaired.  However, if the damage is too severe, you may just want to buy another one.    

CXP cable Collapse
Do I need to buy the CXP cable separately?

The CXP cable is included with and attached to the Miro N5 camera head.

What if the CXP cable breaks?

The CXP cable is field replaceable. You can simply purchase a new one from the Phantom Online store (VRI-CBL-NSERIES-CXP) and attach it.

Can I use any CXP cable, or is there a special one?

The Miro N-Series requires a special CXP cable assembly that uses specific connectors. Therefore, we recommend that you purchase VRI-CBL-NSERIES-CXP from our Phantom Online store if you need a replacement.

Phantom Miro N-JB Base Collapse
Why doesn’t the base have a power supply?

The base receives power and signals through the Miro Junction Box (JBox), and also downloads images through the JBox. It is connected to the JBox with a System cable connected to the System port of the N-JB Base and a Camera port on the JBox.

Do I need to buy a System cable to connect to the JBox?

A System cable is not included with the Miro N-Series, so you may need to purchase one if you do not have an extra. Every customer configuration is different, and we carry a variety of cable lengths to meet your needs.

What is the worst case power draw of the Miro N-JB Base?

The worst case power draw of the entire Miro N-Series system is 18W.  This occurs when the battery in the base is charging.  Otherwise, the power draw is 12W. 

General Information Collapse
Do your products have a CE Declaration?

Yes. Look on our Document Download page for the CE Declarations.

For security reasons, I need to be sure that all high-speed images acquired by my Phantom camera are erased. How are these images stored? And, how can I erase them?

The memory in Phantom digital high-speed cameras is a combination of volatile (DRAM) and non-volatile (Flash) memory. Depending on the model of camera, 1 to 4GB of non-volatile memory is always present and is used only to store the camera's operating system, sensor calibration data, and set-up parameters (i.e. frame rate, resolution, exp, etc.) for the camera. Should this non-volatile memory be erased, the camera would become nonfunctional. This non-volatile memory is not used for storing digital images and does not present a security risk. The internal memory of Phantom cameras that is used for storing digital images is the camera's volatile (DRAM) memory. By the nature of volatile memory, the images are lost when the power for the camera is disconnected or they are overwritten when a user wants to initiate a new recording. Notwithstanding the above, some Phantom cameras are optionally equipped with non-volatile image storage capability in the form of either an internal flash card, an external flash magazine (CineMag), or removable CompactFlash or CineFlash. This storage enables the user to save digital images from the volatile DRAM to non-volatile flash memory. In non-volatile flash devices a user initiated erase/format command (either from PCC or on-camera controls) will erase every data block in the flash chips setting each bit to “1”, except the first block which contains the flash ‘bad block’ information. This first data block never contains digital image information. CompactFlash can be erased/formatted from the LCD user-interface on the Miro eX cameras, or via operating system commands when used in a reader connected to a PC. CineFlash can be erased/formatted from PCC. Additionally, in the CineMag case, the magazine is scanned when connected to the camera, and the scanning stops at the first unerased block. So if the magazine reports that its full capacity is available for recording this is an indication that the previous erase command has been completed and there is no data on the CineMag. For extra security, one can optionally erase a CineMag, remove and reseat it on a camera, cap the camera lens, set the camera to run/stop mode at the highest possible frame rate, then record black frames until the CineMag is full. A subsequent erase will prepare the CineMag for its next use with the assurance no data from previous recordings is present.

How do I get my video into your Gallery?

Vision Research welcomes slow motion videos from our industrial users as well as our entertainment customers. Submission is easy. Send us an email (phantom@ametek.com ) that explains what you’d like to share. In the body of the email give us all the details about your shoot, equipment used, workflow and anything else you think we need to know. We will send you a permission to use form to complete. This form gives us permission to use your footage and tells us how to credit your work. Once we get the completed form, we’ll work with you to get the footage (we prefer the original cine file). Then, we’ll post your high speed video in the Gallery and on our YouTube channel. Slow motion videos in our Gallery are rotated on a weekly basis and randomly chosen for inclusion into the Gallery.

Is there some way to be notified anytime Vision Research introduces new products, or posts software or firmware updates to the web site?

FOCUS is Vision Research’s blog / online newsletter. In it you will find company information, new products announcements and launches, recently released case studies, and innovated ways our high speed digital video cameras are used around the world. Think of  FOCUS as your one stop shop for all news Phantom. Click here to visit our blog.

What are the Export Control Classification Numbers (ECCN) for your cameras?

All Phantom v-Series cameras with the Airborne option (these are no longer shipping) are classified as ECCN 7A994.

All Phantom Miro Airborne and Miro Airborne HD cameras (these are no longer shipping) are classified as ECCN 9A991D.

Any Phantom camera with the FAST option installed (typically this gives you frame rates >= 1,000,000 fps and/or digital exposures < 1 microsecond) such as the Phantom v611, v711, and the Ultrahigh-speed 10, 11, and 12 Series are classified as ECCN 6A003 and are export controlled (see below).

Cameras with ECCN 6A003 can only be exported to these countries with no license required (NLR):

Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Luxembourg, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, United Kingdom.

All other countries require an export license.

All other Phantom cameras are classified as ECCN EAR99.

What is the best way to clean my Phantom high-speed camera sensor and lenses?

A tiny speck of dust on your sensor or filter can lead to a big ugly spot on your images, which is a shame because it is usually avoidable. The longer the lens and smaller the aperture, the more pronounced the spots will appear on your image.

Accessing the Sensor

The first step in sensor cleaning is accessing the sensor itself.  Some cameras (particularly those used in Cinema applications) have an Optical Low Pass Filter (OLPF) in front of the sensor. If that is the case, the lens mount must first be removed. Be sure all shims stay with the mount and are re-installed at the end of the process.  The OLPF will either be attached to the lens mount or a holder in front of the camera. The OLPF holder is also removable in order to access it and the sensor glass.  Do not touch the glass surface of the OLPF during the removal and re-installation process. 

Cleaning the sensor

Rule #1:  If the dust can be removed without using a solvent, you will save yourself a lot of headaches in getting rid of it!  

An important tool for every digital photographer is a bulb-style blower which forces recycled air to clean various optical surfaces. Compressed/Canned air is not recommended, as fluid particles can shoot out and attach to the sensor surface, making cleaning much more difficult.

Another recommended option is to use a sensor brush, such as the Sensor Sweep brush (link below), as it attracts dust particles to the bristles. Be sure to follow the directions. You must clean the brush by blowing air on it and sweeping it across a vellum-like surface to charge the bristles before each sweep on the sensor glass. You can also use the brush to clean the area around the sensor as dust can settle there and then get attracted back onto the sensor glass. Make sure to always blow the bristles free of dust (using a bulb blower) before storing it within its container.

If there is a smudge or dust that won't go away, try a sensor wipe or micro fiber lens cleaning cloth to gently wipe the smudge away. Just like the brush, keep these items clean and dispose of sensor wipes after each use. If you reuse them, they will build up residue which will end up back on the sensor glass.

For very stubborn smudges, you might want to wrap a dry sensor wipe around a long swab for better control. If that doesn't work, a drop of Eclipse lens cleaning solution on the wipe will do the trick. A sensor wipe folded into a point with a drop of Eclipse on the tip can help very concentrated spots as well.  When inspecting the sensor or filter, be sure there is plenty of light pointed at the surface to see what you are doing. 

Tech Tips

  • Cleaning must always be done in a controlled and dust-free environment.
  • Use a tiny flashlight to look at the sensor and/or filter during the cleaning process.
  • Always have clean sensor wipes handy for more serious dirt.
  • Cotton swabs aren't a good idea, unless they are wrapped in a micro fiber or sensor wipe material. Cotton swabs leave behind more than they remove.
  • NEVER blow on the sensor surface or use your finger to get a speck of dust off, it's going to make things much worse.
  • Always keep the Phantom Body cap on the camera when there is no lens attached.

Lens cleaning

Lenses gather a lot of dust as well, which can also wreak havoc on your images. Always keep the rear and front elements protected with their lens caps. There are many products out there safe for cleaning lenses, Here at Vision Research we find that a micro fiber cloth with one drop of Eclipse or Pan-cro solution (on the cloth) works at the fastest with the best results.

A Senor and Lens Care Kit can be purchased in our online store.

What type of training classes do you offer?

We offer hands-on training for Phantom cameras at our Wayne, New Jersey facility. The two-day class has both lecture and labs for the best learning experience. This class is targeted at applications where the cameras will be used for scientific and engineering applications. A schedule of classes can be found here.

On-site training is available.

For customers outside of North America, who prefer local training, most of our International Sales Partners offer training courses tailored to your needs.

If your application is TV or Motion Picture production, consider training courses targeted at those applications from Abel Cine Tech, or other Phantom resellers around the world who focus on the "entertainment" market.

You have so many different models of the Phantom digital high speed camera that it’s hard to tell them apart. Is there a place where I can see all of your cameras on one page?

There sure is! Visit our camera comparison page. All of our digital high speed cameras are listed on one page.

Technical Support Collapse
Can I create a log to capture issues with my camera and controller?

 

A log can go a long way in determining what's going on inside the camera and the performance of the controller.  To create a log, perform the following steps: 

  1. Start the Phantom application.
  2. Go to the HELP tab and then select ABOUT.
  3. Select LOGGING from the ABOUT window.
  4. Click on the ALL button from the LOGGING OPTIONS window.
  5. Select OK from the LOGGING OPTIONS window.
  6. Select CLOSE from the ABOUT window.
  7. Close and restart the Phantom application.
  8. Perform the steps to create the issue in question.
  9. Go to the HELP tab and then select ABOUT.
  10. Select LOGGING from the ABOUT window.
  11. For a single camera, click on the EXTRACT and then select OK from the LOGGING OPTIONS window.  For multiple cameras, select EXTRACT ALL and then select OK from the LOGGING OPTIONS window.
  12. Select the NONE button from the LOGGING OPTIONS window.
  13. Select OK from the LOGGING OPTIONS window.
  14. Select CLOSE from the ABOUT window.
  15. Exit the Phantom application.
  16. Create a C:LOG directory.
  17. Go to the Phantom Directory (C:Program Files>Phantom) and locate PhCon.log and move the file to the C:LOG directory.  Attach PhCon.log to an e-mail to technical support. 
  18. Go to the Phantom Directory (C:Program Files>Phantom) and locate the internal camera log.  The format for the file is CAM.log where S/N is the serial number of the camera.  Move the file(s) to the C:LOG directory   Attach the CAM.log file(s) to an e-mail to technical support. 

How can I change the IP address of my camera from the default?

Part A: Open Nucleus Utility from within PCC:

Open the PCC software

  1. From the Manager tab, click on the camera ‘Nucleus’ button (molecule icon in bottom right corner)
  2. Once Nucleus is open, select the ‘Secondary IP’ tab
     

Part B: Configure Secondary IP:

  1. In the Camera Repair and Firmware Upgrade (Nucleus) dialogue window, click the down-arrow next to the Camera field and select the camera the Secondary IP Address is to be assigned to
  2. Click on the Secondary Ip Tab, then
  3. Enter the appropriate Secondary IP information for the camera, including the:
    1. IP Address
    2. Subnet mask
    3. Broadcast address
    4. Gateway address, then
    5. Click the Set button.

    NOTE

    If the control unit does not detect the camera, re-check the settings of the control unit.

    Setting the IP Address of a camera does not remove its default IP address. In the event, you need to verify the camera’s user defined IP Address, or made a mistake entering the information, simply reset the control unit’s IP Address to 100.100.100.1, and reconnect to the camera making any necessary changes using the steps above.

    These instructions can be found on page 298 of the linked document

    http://www.phantomhighspeed.com/uploads/docs/Documentation/PCC2.6.pdf

 

How do I find the firmware versions running in my camera?

It's easy.  If you are using PCC, power up your camera and connect it to your controller and launch the Application.  Click on the LIVE tab and select the camera you are interested in and select CAMERA INFO. The following screen will show up:

The firmware version in your camera will the number next to the words, "Firmware version", the bin version will be the number next to the words, "FPGA version" and the kernel version will be the number next to the words “Kernel version”.

  1. The following screen will show up:

The firmware version in your camera will the number next to the words, "Firmware version", the bin version will be the number next to the words, "FPGA version" and the kernel version will be the number next to the words “Kernel version”.

 For legacy software: Power up your camera and connect it to your controller and launch the Phantom application.  In the application go to HELP and select ABOUT.   The following screen will show up

The firmware version in your camera will the number next to the word, "Firmware", the bin version will be the number next to the word, "FPGA" and the kernel version will be the number next to the word “Kernel”.

How do I reload my camera’s factory STG file?

A:  Here are the steps to reload the camera’s factory STG

1) Power up the camera

2) Open the Phantom software, but do NOT go into acquisition/set up & recording. (If you get any messages about updating or copying STG files at this point, just dismiss them)

3) Minimize the Phantom software (do not close)

4) With the software and camera running, go into Windows Explorer and locate the existing STG.  The existing STG can be found in the following path: Program Files -> Phantom -> XXXX.STG where XXXX is the S/N of the camera

5) Delete the old STG file ("serial number".STG AND ALL ‘long’ STG files)

6) Copy the STG file from either your CD or the STG that you downloaded into the Program Files -> Phantom folder. If you cannot locate the CD, please contact Technical Support at support@visionresearch.com and we’ll get you the most recent factory STG file

7) Maximize the Phantom software

8) Select  Acquisition Menu

9) Select  Restore NV Memory

10) Select  Load & Write to NV Memory

11) Close

12) Exit out of the Phantom software

13) Reboot the camera by removing and replacing power

14) Open the Phantom software

I've installed Phantom Software and assigned the controller's IP address and my camera won't communicate with the controller, what's wrong?

What's happening is the firewall is protecting the controller from the camera.  To alleviate this problem, the firewall needs to be disabled.  In order to do this, you may need administrator privileges.  Go to the control panel and locate Windows Firewall and double click on it.  In the pop-up window verify the firewall is set to off.

My camera used to communicate with the PC / controller now it won’t. What should I do?

There are several steps in troubleshooting this problem. Here is the procedure (if your camera is of the firewire variety please contact tech support:

1. Click the Windows START button and select the RUN command.

2. Type: CMD, and click the OK button.

3. In the C:Windowssystem32cmd.exe window, type: ping at the C: prompt.  (the IP address of the camera is located on the bottom the camera).

4. Click Enter.

    a. If properly installed the camera should reply to the Ping Request.
    b. If the Phantom Control Unit fails to detect the camera:
       1) Unplug the Cat-5 cable from the Network Phantom Control Unit computer, and ensure the proper cable type is being used.
       2) Re-insert the proper cable.
       3) Verify the TCP/IP addressing information is correct.  The steps to verify the TCP/IP addressing information is contained in steps 5-9.
       4) Shutdown the Network Phantom Control Unit computer.
       5) Remove power from the camera.
       6) Restart the Network Phantom Control Unit computer.
       7) Re-apply power to the camera.
       8) Ping the camera again to verify the Phantom camera replies to the Ping Request.

5.  From Windows' Start button, go to Control Panel>Network Connections.

6. Right-click Local Area Connections>Properties to view a list of components used by your system.

7. Select Internet Protocol (TCP/IP).

8. Click the Properties button.

9. When the Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) properties box opens:

    a. Select Use the Following IP Address and enter the following:
       1) IP Address: 100.100.100.1
NOTE:  If multiple Phantom Control Units will be used to access the same Phantom cameras, each controller unit requires a unique IP Address. For example: 
Controller Unit 1: 100.100.100.1 (255.255.0.0); 
Controller Unit 2: 100.100.100.2 (255.255.0.0), etc.
       2) Subnet mask: 255.255.0.0 or (255.255.255.0 for v7.0 only)
    b. Select Use the Following DNS and leave the entry blank.
    c. Click OK to complete the setup 

10. From Windows' Start button, go to Control Panel>Windows Firewall and verify that the firewall is set to OFF.

11.  If the above steps do not resolve the issue, please contact technical support at support@visionresearch.com

My image quality is not as good as it used to be. What should I do to fix the problem?

Depending on when your camera was made after 2009, performing an ILOAD will restore the camera to it’s factory settings.  Here is how you do it:

1.  Go to the Windows START button and select RUN..

2.  In the RUN window that pops up in the line that reads OPEN, type in the following:

               telnet 7115 

NOTE: There is one space between “telnet” and the IP address and one space between the IP address and “7115”

3.  Press OK

4.  Press ENTER two times.  The controller will respond with "?".

5.  Type in the following:

               ILOAD

6.  Press ENTER once.  The controller will respond with "Ok!". 

7.  Type in the following:

               ILOAD

8.  Press ENTER once.  The controller will respond with "OK!". 

9.  Close the Command Prompt window, power cycle the camera.

Most image issues can be resolved by performing a Current Session Reference (CSR) or reloading the cameras factory .STG file. If either of these two methods doesn’t work, please send a 3-4 cine to support@visionresearch.com. The cine file will provide the most of the information about the camera so we can diagnose your problem. support@visionresearch.com

What information should I have when contacting Vision Research Technical Support?

When contacting Technical Support, you should have the following information:

1. The S/N of the camera.

2. Firmware in the camera - To find this information out, launch the Phantom application and click on HELP tab followed by the ABOUT tab and make a note of the following information: Phantom Camera Control Version, Firmware, Kernel, and FPGA.

3. If you have image problems, a 3-4 frame Cine would be helpful.

What is a Current Session Reference (CSR) and when should I use it?

The Phantom Camera sensor is made up of thousands of pixels whose sensitivity can drift due to changes in resolution, exposure, time and temperature.  A Current Session Reference calibrates all the pixels that will be used for a given set of camera parameters.  It is usually good practice to perform a CSR anytime a change is made in camera settings or lighting.  This ensures that the camera sensor will deliver the best possible picture available.

Phantom Cameras Collapse
For security reasons, I need to be sure that all high-speed images acquired by my Phantom camera are erased. How are these images stored? And, how can I erase them?

The memory in Phantom digital high-speed cameras is a combination of volatile (DRAM) and non-volatile (Flash) memory. 

Depending on the model of camera, either 1GB or 4GB of non-volatile memory is always present and is used only to store the camera's operating system, sensor calibration data, and set-up parameters (i.e. frame rate, resolution, exp, etc.) for the camera. Should this non-volatile memory be erased, the camera would become nonfunctional. This non-volatile memory is not used for storing digital images and does not present a security risk.
 
The internal memory of Phantom cameras that is used for storing digital images is the camera's volatile (DRAM) memory.  By the nature of volatile memory, the images are lost when the power for the camera is disconnected or they are overwritten when a user wants to initiate a new recording.
 
Notwithstanding the above, some Phantom cameras are optionally equipped with non-volatile image storage capability in the form of either an internal flash card, an external flash magazine (CineMag), or removable CompactFlash or CineFlash. This storage enables the user to save digital images from the volatile DRAM to non-volatile flash memory.   

For CineMags, a user initiated erase/format command will erase every data block in the flash chips, except the first block which contains the flash ‘bad block’ information. This first data block never contains digital image information.

CompactFlash can be erased/formatted from the LCD user-interface, or via operating system commands when used in a reader connected to a PC. However, these steps alone are insufficient to ensure a "secure" erase.

CineFlash can be erased/formatted from PCC. But, this is not a "secure" erase. We plan to provide a command or utility to do a secure erase in the future.

Additionally, in the CineMag case, the magazine is scanned when connected to the camera, and the scanning stops at the first unerased block. So if the magazine reports that its full capacity is available for recording this is an indication that the previous erase command has been completed.

How do you determine the light sensitivity of your cameras?

We test our cameras' light sensitivity to an industry standard: ISO 12232. We use the SAT method which we think is the best method for determining a sensor's sensitivity. The SAT method does not use gain to boost sensitivity. When using gain to increase sensitivity, you also boost the noise level. A gain adjustment to boost sensitivity is available on all Phantom cameras using image processing tools, if increased noise can be tolerated.

I want to use my slow motion video camera for capturing underwater events. Do you have any underwater housings available?

We do not manufacturer such equipment, however, there are several manufacturer's of underwater housings for all types of camera equipment. 

Corel Sea TV are making some custom enclosures for our Phantom v640 and Phantom HD GOLD cameras.

Prevco is a subsea engineering consultancy and manufacturer specializing in submersible pressure vessels, instrumentation housings, junction boxes, vent plugs, pressure relief valves and other accessories to meet all your underwater equipment needs for the Phantom line of digital high speed video cameras.

If you supply underwater housings or know of another supplier, please let us know so we can add to this list.

What are the sensor dimensions for my camera?

 Camera Pixel Size (microns)Sensor Size (pixels)Sensor Size (mm)
7.3 22 800 x 600 17.6 x 13.2
 9.111.51632 x 120018.8 x 13.8
10.011.52400 x 180027.6 x 20.7
v640/1102560 x 160025.6 x 16 
Miro 1, eX1 22640 x 48014.1 x 10.6
Miro 2, eX222640 x 48014.1 x 10.6
Miro 322800 x 60017.6 x 13.2
Miro 4, eX4, AB22800 x 60017.6 x 13.2
 Miro AB HD1.2 1920 x 1080 10.6 x 5.9
Miro M110, M310201280 x 80025.6 x 16.0
Miro M120101920 x 120019.2 x 12.0
HD12.52048 x 204825.6 x 16.0
 Phantom 6512.54096 x 244051.2 x 30.5
 v611, v211, v311, v711201280 x 80025.6 x 16.0
v1210, v1610281280 x 80035.8 x 22.4

Legacy Cameras

Camera   Pixel Size (microns) Sensor Size (pixels)Sensor Size (mm) 
4.016512 x 5128.2 x 8.2
 4.116512 x 5128.2 x 8.2
4.222512 x 51211.3 x 11.3
4.322800 x 60017.6 x 13.2
5.0, 5.1161024 x 102416.4 x 16.4
 6.2e22512 x 51211.3 x 11.3
 7.1, 7.222800 x 60017.6 x 13.2
9.011.51632 x 120018.8 x 13.8
v12201280 x 80025.6 x 16.0
v12.1, v210, v310, v710201280 x 800 25.6 x 16.0

How do I clean my high speed digital camera after it was used in dusty or sandy environments?

We recommend you blow off the camera using forced or compressed air and a damp cloth. For cleaning the Phantom CineMag’s contacts please use a cotton-swab and electrical contact cleaner (or alcohol safe for electronics). Be very gentle.  For cleaning sensors we recommend using a brush-based cleaning solution or forced air (do not blow on the sensor or use canned air).

We offer a sensor cleaning kit in our online store.

What is the best way to clean my Phantom high-speed cameras' sensor and lenses?

Sensor cleaning is a hot topic for digital camera users - Phantom and otherwise - and there are definite techniques on tackling it. Depending on your lighting situation, a tiny speck of dust on your sensor can lead to a big ugly spot on your images, which is a shame because it is usually avoidable. The longer the lens and smaller the aperture, the more pronounced the spots will appear on your image.

The No.1 rule is that if the dust can be removed without using a solvent, you will save yourself a lot of headaches in getting rid of it! Use the Sensor Sweep brush, (link below), as it attracts the particles to the bristles. Be sure to follow the directions. You must clean the brush by blowing air on it and sweeping it across a vellum-like surface to charge the bristles before each sweep on the sensor glass. You can also use the brush to clean the area around the sensor as dust can settle there and then get attracted back onto the sensor glass. Make sure to always blow the bristles free of dust before storing it within its container.

Compressed air is OK as a quick solution, but always test the spray first away from the sensor to make sure none of the fluid comes out. Use short bursts and hold the can upright. A better solution would be to use a blower that recycles air to force the dust off of and from around the sensor.

If there is a smudge or dust that won't go away, try a micro fiber lens cleaning cloth to gently wipe the smudge away. Just like the brush, keep the cloth clean, if you reuse them, they can build up residue, which will end up back on the sensor glass. For very stubborn smudges, you might want to wrap the micro fiber cloth or a piece of lens tissue around a pencil eraser or long swab for better control. If that doesn't work, a drop or spray of lens cleaning solution on the cloth will do the trick.. make sure it isn't too wet before wiping it on the sensor glass. Lens tissue folded into a point with a drop of lens solution can help very concentrated spots as well.

TECH TIPS

  • · Use a tiny flashlight to look at the sensor, it's easier to spot the dust.
  • · Always have a clean micro fiber cloth handy for more serious dirt.
  • · Cotton swabs aren't a good idea, unless they are wrapped in a micro fiber or lens tissue like material. They leave behind    more than they remove.
  • · Never use your finger to get a speck of dust off, it's going to make things much worse.
  • · Never blow on the sensor itself (as tempting as it is).
  • · Always keep the Phantom Body cap on the camera when there is no lens attached.

Lenses gather a lot of dust as well, which can also wreak havoc on your images. Always keep the rear and front elements protected with their lens caps. There are many products out there safe for cleaning lenses, Here at Vision Research, we find that a micro fiber cloth with one spray of Eclipse or Pan-cro solution (on the cloth) works at the fastest with the best results.

What is "circular buffer" or "loop" recording?

Each slo-mo Phantom camera comes with a fixed amount of very high-speed dynamic RAM. When the camera is in the pre-trigger mode (you've pressed "Capture" in the user interface), the camera is continuously recording images into that memory. When it gets to the end of memory, it cycles back to the beginning and continues recording. This behavior is called "circular buffer recording".

The slow motion camera is always "live". What you end up actually saving in memory is a function of how you've set up your trigger. You can set it up such that only frames that occur after the trigger are saved, so any images already in memory are overwritten and you record an event after the trigger (until memory is full). If you set the trigger to stop the recording and save all frames up to the time of the trigger, the camera will simply stop recording upon the trigger and all the frames in memory before the trigger will be saved. Finally, you can set the trigger anywhere in the middle, for example having 90% of the recorded movie be what happens prior to the trigger and 10% after the trigger.

Can I get a datasheet for my discontinued cameras?

Yes you can!  Surf your way over to the Documents page of our Support section. Scroll down the page until you  find the Discontinued Products selection. The datasheets are in model numbered order.

Or, you can find them under the Support by Model menu selection.

I need to have wireless remote control over a camera. How can I do this?

Our new Remote Control Unit has Bluetooth(r) wireless remote capabilities. Depending upon your camera model, you will need to outfit it with a Break-out-Box that has Bluetooth capability, or use a Bluetooth "dongle" directly on the remote port of the camera. Then, a Bluetooth-enable RCU can be used to remotely control the camera.

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I am looking for information on a renting a Phantom digital high speed video camera. Who do I need to contact?

Engineering, Scientific, Industrial Applications (USA only) -- Vision Research rents several of our Phantom high-speed video cameras for industrial, scientific and engineering applications. The cameras are available on a first-come, first-serve basis. Our high speed rentals come complete with a controller (laptop), cables, and a lens. There is a 2 day minimum on all camera rentals. Please contactrentals@visionresearch.com for more information and a quote.

Production & Entertainment Applications (World-Wide)  -- Visit our directory of world-wide high speed rental partners.

Do you rent worldwide?

Our American offices only rent to companies with addresses within the US and Canada.

Check out our network of worldwide rental partners.

What is your minimum and maximum rental periods?

The minimum rental period for most of our cameras is two days, and there is no maximum rental duration. We do discount rentals that are one month or longer.

If I rent a camera from you, what all is included?

With your rental of a Phantom camera, you will also receive a Dell or HP Laptop Controller with the Phantom software installed. The controller is needed to setup and control the camera as well as download and save cine files. You can choose a lens from our wide selection. We will also include a Northstar light, upon request.

We also offer lights, tripods and other accessories.

All items are shipped in a rugged case.

Phantom Ultra High-Speed 1Mpx Cameras Collapse
What is the difference between the UHS-12 Series (v2512, v2012, v1612 and v1212) and the previous UHS-11 Series (v2511, v2011, v1611 and v1211)?

The UHS-12 Series are similar to the UHS-11 Series, except for two differences. The first difference is the increase in memory.  The UHS-12 Series can be equipped with either 72GB, 144GB, or 288GB of RAM. The second difference is that the UHS-12 Series take advantage of the CineMag IV, with 1TB or 2TB of non-volatile memory.  These enhancements are designed to make capturing, accessing, and managing your critical data much easier. The UHS-12 Cameras have the same excellent sensitivity and framerates as the UHS-11 cameras, with the same Phantom Features and outstanding image quality you’ve come to expect from Phantom digital high-speed cameras.

Can you describe the cooling system for the Phantom v2512, v2012, v1612 and v1212?

To minimize noise and maximize image quality on any digital high-speed camera, it is important to control the sensor temperature. By keeping the sensor at a fixed temperature, you will get better, more repeatable images. For many years, Vision Research has used thermo-electric (TE) coolers based on the Peltier effect to control sensor temperature. The sensor die is attached to the TE cooler and by monitoring the temperature of the sensor, the camera can supply more or less power to the TE cooler to adjust the temperature.

The TE cooler is typically bonded to a heat sink cooled by an active fan-based cooling system.

This technology is used on the v2512, v2012, v1612 and v1212. However, these cameras run so fast, that additional cooling technology is employed. On these cameras the sensor die is attached to the TE cooler, which in turn is bonded to a copper heat sink which has heat pipes attached. The heat pipes carry excess heat away from the sensor area toward the sides of the camera where heat is removed using dual fans.

The heat pipe is a copper tube that is filled with a liquid under low pressure.  One end of the heat pipe is bonded to the source of heat, in this case the copper heat sink. The other side is bonded to a heat sink which is fan cooled. Liquid in the heat pipe moves toward the source of heat through capillary action. When it gets to the hot side of the pipe, it will turn to vapor and circulate back to the cool side where it gives up heat and turns back into liquid. The process then repeats.

The v2512, v2012, v1612 and v1212 all have a 10Gb Ethernet interface. Tell me more about it and how to use it.

Yes, a copper UTP 10Gbase-T Ethernet interface is standard on all UHS cameras and the CineStation IV. When optimized, this allows for cine downloads at speeds more than 5X faster than the standard Gb Ethernet interface.

While any compatible 10GBASE-T interface card installed in a PC should work, we have been using and recommending the Intel X540-T1 and X540-T2 cards. Be sure the latest Intel drivers are installed, and the appropriate network address is assigned to it (For example, IP 172.16.0.1 and Subnet 255.255.0.0)  Also, ensure either either the Phantom 10G Network driver and/or WinPCap is installed.

Vision Research provides a ruggedized connector carrier to be used when connecting a standard CAT6 or CAT6A Ethernet cable between the camera and the interface card. The customer must supply the appropriate cable.

A CAT6A or CAT7 cable is recommended and gives you a maximum 100m distance between the camera and the interface card. (A CAT6 cable is limited to 50m.)

Can I use a viewfinder with the v2512, v2012, v1612 and v1212?

Yes. In fact, there is a viewfinder port on the camera that will supply video and power to a viewfinder or monitor. All UHS-12 digital cameras come with a 280W power supply, providing ample power for a camera with maximum 288GB memory, a 2TB CineMag, and the viewfinder.

Do the v2512, v2012, v1612 and v1212 support the use of Canon EOS lenses with software control over aperture and focus?

Yes. You need to order the optional Canon EOS lens mount and use it with one of the tested and supported lenses (see FAQ elsewhere). The part number is: VRI-MNT-EOS-VSERIES.

What signals are available on the Capture Connector on the back of the camera, and which of those are provided on the standard Capture Cable that ships with the camera?

There is a 19-pin Amphenol connector on the back of the camera that is called the Capture Connector. The connector has the following available signals:

  • Event input (an external signal can “mark” one or more frames with an event marker making it easy to later find and view specific frames)
  • Trigger input (provides a hardware trigger to the camera)
  • Strobe output (is a low during the frame exposure time)
  • Ready output (is high when the camera is capturing pretrigger frames)
  • IRIG-In (external sync and time stamping from a modulated or unmodulated IRIG source)
  • IRIG-Out (provides an umodulated IRIG source that contains timing information from the camera)
  • Video Out (a composite video signal, either NTSC or PAL)
  • Serial Port input (for serial protocol control of camera)
  • Power Out (24VDC, used to power the Break-out-Box)
  • A-Sync output (optionally, signal goes low when a trigger event is detected by the Image-Based Auto-Trigger feature allowing for multiple cameras to be synchronized to an event trigger)
  • Pre-trigger / Memgate input (mode is set in software; if Memgate is low, acquired frames are discarded rather than saved to camera memory; Pre-trigger signal “arms” the camera and starts the acquisition of pretrigger frames)

Detailed information about these signals is available using the PCC application’s Help feature.

All v2512, v2012, v1612 and v1212 cameras ship with a standard Capture Cable that connects to the Capture Connector and provides access to:

  • Ready
  • Strobe
  • A-Sync
  • Pre-trigger/Memgate
  • Video

All other signals are accessible by using a Phantom Break-out-Box. See the related FAQ.

Can I use any Vision Research power supply with the v2512, v2012, v1612 and v1212? I have a power supply from a UHS-11 Series camera, can I use it?

No, you must use the 280W power supply shipped with the camera. It is part number: VRI-PWR-SUPPLY-280W-FIS. Spares and replacement power supplies are available online from Vision Research.

What does the AUTO/ON/OFF switch do?

Prior to the introduction of the Phantom UHS-10 Series (the predecessors to the UHS-11 and UHS-12 Series), Phantom cameras did not have a physical power switch. Instead, the camera powered up any time an appropriate DC voltage appeared on the power input to the camera. This was done so that cameras can be powered up (booted) remotely by providing primary power and did not require physical access to the camera.

However, there is a physical power switch on the v2512, v2012, v1612 and v1212. It has three positions: AUTO, ON, and OFF.

When the switch is set to AUTO, providing power to the Primary DC Input will power up (boot) the camera and it will be ready for use. In AUTO, providing power to the Battery Backup power input of an unpowered camera WILL NOT power up the camera. However, if there is a loss of primary power, then the Battery Backup power will be used to maintain camera operation and protect any stored data.

When the switch is in the OFF position, the camera is off. Providing power to the Primary DC Power input or the Battery Backup input will not cause the camera to power-up.

When the switch is moved to the ON position, the camera will power-up immediately provided there is power connected to the Primary DC Power port OR the Battery Backup port on the camera

There are several use-cases this scheme enables:

  1. Battery backup for mission critical tests: Set the camera to AUTO. Power through the Primary input and provide local battery backup power to the Battery Backup input. If primary power is lost, camera operation will continue and data is protected by the battery backup.
     
  2. Remote power up: You can turn the camera on by providing power to the Primary DC Power input when the camera is in AUTO or ON.
     
  3. Remote power cycle: If the camera will need to have power cycled remotely, set the switch to AUTO and do not use a battery for battery backup.
     

Battery operation: Connect a battery to the Battery Backup port. Set the switch to ON.

I see there are two power input ports. One is the Primary DC Power and the other is the Battery Backup. How do these work?

The primary input is where you plug the 280W A/C power supply provided with the camera. This is your primary source of power for the camera. You can optionally connect a backup source of power—often a battery—to the backup battery power input. If the camera power switch is set to AUTO, and if there is a loss of power on the primary input, even momentarily, the backup power will immediately take over - providing uninterrupted power to the camera. This is important to protect any images stored in the camera’s high-speed memory from accidental loss.

Connecting power to the battery backup port will not turn on the camera. (See FAQ about the AUTO/ON/OFF switch.) There is no drain from the connected battery unless a loss of primary power causes the power input to switch to the battery backup.

The battery backup port will not charge a connected battery.

In case of primary power loss, the backup battery port will not only protect images saved in memory, but can provide sufficient power to power all camera operations until the input voltage drops below the minimum required, ~ 18VDC.

If primary power is restored, that again becomes the power source for the camera and the battery port reverts to a backup mode.

Tell me more about the GPS port on the back of the camera.

The GPS port on the Phantom v2512, v2012, v1612 and v1212 can be used to provide date, time and location information from the GPS satellite network. Vision Research sells a compatible GPS receiver (VRI-GPS-18X-LVC-5M). With the GPS receiver connected to the camera, and assuming it has a valid satellite fix, GPS timing can be used similarly to IRIG timing. You can synchronize the camera’s internal clock to the GPS, timestamp frames with GPS timing accuracy, and even save the camera’s latitude and longitude with any cine file (location error is < 3 meters after a satellite fix.)

The GPS connection supplies 5 volts at 0.2 A maximum, and an RS-232 connection to a GPS device.

1 PPS pulse is used for timing in the camera.

Communication with the device is at 4800 baud over the NEMA 0183 standard protocol which is very common.

The GPS position is recorded in the Cine header file.

Connection diagram is available

These cameras can have a lot of memory in them! How long does it take to save a shot from these cameras?

All of the Phantom Ultra High-Speed Cameras (v2512, v2012, v1612 and v1212) are equipped standard with 10GB Ethernet and can be equipped with the unique CineMag interface, precisely for fast downloading. 

The 10GB Ethernet allows data transfer at up to 500 MB/second on optimized systems, meaning all 288GB of memory can be downloaded in approximately 8 minutes.

The CineMag interface can transfer images from the camera’s high-speed memory to non-volatile, flash memory at about 1Gpx/sec. A full resolution frame is 1 Mpx, so you can save about 1000 frames each second to a CineMag. Or, another way to state this is you can save about 1.5GB/sec to non-volatile mass-storage. A Phantom Ultra High-Speed Camera, equipped with maximum memory of 288GB, can save its full memory buffer to a CineMag in just over 3 minutes.

Once a shot is saved to the CineMag it is safely stored and available for later retrieval. This means you immediately can use the camera for another shot.

Images stored on a CineMag are available for later retrieval using the Phantom Camera Control (PCC) software with the CineMag mounted on either the camera or the offline docking station known as a CineStation, and may be downloaded either through the camera or the CineStation, using their 10Gb Ethernet ports.

The v2512, v2012, v1612 and v1212 are only compatible with CineMags IV’s, offered in 1TB and 2TB versions.

Will the Phantom Remote Control Unit (RCU) work with the v2512, v2012, v1612 and v1212 cameras?

Yes it will. You can connect through the remote port on the camera either with a "Remote" cable or Bluetooth dongle. You can also use an RCU connected via the Break-out-Box.

If you connect using the remote port on the camera then you will also have to connect to one of the HD-SDI outputs of the camera to see video on the RCU.

Connecting through the Break-out-Box provides NTSC or PAL video to the RCU.

Will the liquid in the heat pipes freeze and damage the heat pipes if the camera is stored or transported at temperatures below freezing?

There is no danger. First, there is actually very little liquid in the heat pipe. And, it is under very low pressure. So, while the liquid might freeze, it will not damage the heat pipe. Soon after powering the camera, the liquid will thaw.

What is the worst case power draw of the camera that I would use to calculate battery requirements?

You should assume the camera will consume 240 watts. This assumes that you are not using a viewfinder with the camera, but that it has a CineMag and full memory.

Is it true that a camera that runs this fast must be powered by either dilithium or silithium crystals?

No. We've been able to achieve these rates of speed without the use of such technology.

Phantom VEO Collapse
Tell me more about the CFast workflow. What is the transfer rate from RAM to the CFast card? Can you write directly to the card in Run/Stop mode?

The CFast workflow is most similar to the CineFlash module of the Phantom Miro.  Cine files are recorded first to RAM and then transferred to the CFast card at a speed of 90 MB/second. The CFast card does NOT support Run/Stop mode or playback over video.

Lexar x3600 128 and 256GB cards have been tested and verified.  Additional cards will be verified and added to our compatibility list.

CFast 2.0 cards are required.  They must be formatted NTFS, which can be done either in camera or from an external USB CFast 2.0 Card Reader.  Due to the NTFS format, no special drivers are required for downloading the Cine files via Windows or Mac.

Does the VEO camera have NTSC/PAL video?

There is no NTSC or PAL video signal.

All VEO models include SDI and HDMI outputs which output all standard 1.5G and 3G SDI video rates from 720p50 to 1080p60

Can you use a battery with Phantom VEO cameras?

We are working on a solution that supports 12V v-Lock or Gold-mount batteries.   Alternatively, 24V standing batteries can be used with the VEO Batt accessory cable.

Are Phantom VEO cameras compatible with the RCU?

The RCU has not been updated for use with the VEO, however an RCU running firmware version 5.5 will provide basic capture trigger play and save functionality.  It will not recognize the camera model properly. 

Are VEO cameras compatible with the Miro-JB or previous Junction Box?

Phantom VEO cameras are not compatible with the Miro-JB due to the camera’s power requirements. 
VEO cameras should be synchronized using F-Sync and/or IRIG.  

Phantom Miro R-Series Collapse
What is the difference between the new Rxx1 cameras and the previous Rxx0 cameras?

There are only a few changes, but they are important. First, we’ve added a door to cover the CineFlash slot. This makes the camera more compatible with harsh environments and outdoor applications. We’ve also added our internal mechanical shutter as a standard component. This allows for remote and/or automatic black referencing, ensuring optimal image quality on each shot. Adding this shutter leads to the next difference: the shock rating with the shutter is now 30Gs which is lower than the shock spec on the older R-Series.

If you plan to use the new R-Series cameras in a high-shock application (such as crash test), you’ll want to have the internal mechanical shutter removed—there is an option you can select when you order the camera that will do this. Without the shutter, the shock rating is 100Gs. The camera retains the highly rugged metal body along with CineFlash system compatibility and battery operation.

Phantom Miro M / R / LC-Series Cameras Collapse
What are the differences between the Phantom Miro 320S and the Phantom Flex?

  • Frame rate and resolution: The Phantom Flex has both higher resolution and throughput than the Phantom Miro 320S, and up to 32GB of internal RAM memory as opposed to the Phantom Miro 320S’s 12GB of RAM.  This means longer record times can be achieved on the Flex.
  • Flash storage: The Flex uses the Phantom CineMag storage system, which can save 12GB in about 12 seconds, as opposed to the Phantom Miro 320S’s CineFlash storage system which will save a full 12GB take in about 3 minutes.  Flex Cine files saved to the CineMag can be later reviewed on camera or CineStation over HD-SDI. Reviewing Cines stored on the CineFlash from a Phantom Miro 320S is not possible over HD-SDI. CineFlash files can be reviewed in-camera over Ethernet in PCC, or via the CineFlash dock when preparing to download footage.
  • Color processing: The Phantom Miro 320S supports the new Phantom PH16 protocol, which means improved white balance and color processing controls.  The Flex is based on the Ph7 protocol which includes legacy red & blue gain white balance and color processing.
  • HD-SDI: Video playback over 4:2:2 HD-SDI is possible on both camera models, however the Flex supports advanced in-camera scaling for larger resolutions as well as either 4:4:4 video or 2x identical HD-SDI feeds.
  • Power and additional monitoring: The Flex features a separate viewfinder port and 2x auxiliary power ports, which the Phantom Miro 320S does not have.  The Phantom Miro 320S does however have a built in battery port for use with common Sony camcorder batteries.
  • Size & Weight: The Phantom Miro 320S is approximately 3 lbs and 7.5 x 3.5 x 4”, and the Phantom Flex weighs in at 11.75 lbs and 11.5 x 5.5 x 5.0”

For a full comparison of the Phantom Miro 320S and the Phantom Flex please click here.

How do you install the battery on Miro M / R / LC-Series cameras?

Please watch this short tutorial video on the correct way to install the battery. Please note that Vision Research only recommends Sony BPU-30 and BPU-60 batteries. Batteries that are larger and heavier than the BPU-60 can damage the battery terminals and should not be used.

What does the OFF / AUTO / ON switch do on Miro M / R / LC cameras?

In the ON position, the camera will boot up with a battery connected and/or an external power supply connected to the camera’s DC input. When using a power supply, the battery acts as a battery backup. Note: the battery does not charge when installed in the camera. 

In the AUTO position, the camera will only power up when voltage is first applied to the DC input of the camera. A battery can be installed without the camera booting up. This is useful for when a user intends to power up the camera remotely, and maintain the battery backup feature. 

In the OFF position, the camera is off.

What is the power input spec for the camera? And, under what circumstances does the camera switch to battery power?

The input power spec is 12-28VDC. The power supply provided by Vision Research provides 24VDC power to the camera.

If the power input to the camera drops below 16VDC and a battery is connected to the camera, the camera will begin to draw power from the battery if the camera is in ON or AUTO mode. This is a data protection safety feature.

What video formats are available?

Miro M/R/LC 120, 110, and 310 models provide standard NTSC and PAL composite video, selectable in PCC and available from the capture port.  The video signal is also embedded in the RCU connection cable which provides video for the RCU. 

Miro M/R/LC 320S specific model does not support NTSC or PAL. The 320S models have a single HD-SDI output that supports 720p, 1080i and 1080 psf signals. When using an RCU with the 320S cameras the video signal has to come from the HD-SDI port. 

Miro 140 and 340 and Miro LAB camera models do not have a video output of any kind.  The live image must be displayed over Ethernet using Phantom PCC software. 

On Miro cameras with NTSC / PAL video the resolutions are typically greater than a NTSC / PAL monitor. Is the image cropped or scaled to fit the screen?

The camera shows the whole image filling the screen by default; this is most useful when framing a shot. A pixel-for-pixel zoom (1:1) is available that center-crops the image and is useful for focusing.

What does the Autoset button do?

Hold down the Autoset button to close the internal shutter and perform a Current Session Reference (CSR).  Also, tap the Autoset button to cycle between various zoom and threshold settings for the camera’s video output. 

Can you record directly to the CineFlash?

No, you cannot record directly to the CineFlash. There is no “run/stop” mode on the Miro cameras.

CineFlash Dock Installation Instructions

Footage from Phantom Miro M / R / LC camera models is stored on CineFlash drives as 10-bit log raw cine files.  The CineFlash drive is formatted using the Linux Ext2 file system, and can be accessed from the camera body over Ethernet, or remotely using a Phantom CineFlash Dock via USB3 or eSATA. 

The CineFlash Dock is compatible with both PC and Mac computers once the appropriate EXT2 driver is installed. This allows 3rd party solutions that can read Cine raw files to see the file directly from the CineFlash. This also means that you can “drag and drop” the file from the CineFlash to local storage on a computer.

Phantom CineFlash Docks shipped after October 1, 2015 include the recommended Paragon ExtFS driver on a USB flash drive, which can be installed on a single Windows OS or Macintosh OSX computer, and installation instructions. During the installation process, you will be asked to provide a ‘Product Key’ and ‘Serial Number’ (located on the bottom of the Phantom CineFlash Dock – also beginning October 2015) to validate the single-user license.

Please note that the Product Key and Serial Number are bound to the computer on which the ExtFS driver is installed, not the Phantom CineFlash Docking Station.

CineFlash Dock users without the USB drive or product key can download and purchase the latest Paragon ExtFS drivers athttps://www.paragon-software.com/  

Once installed, the CineFlash will automatically be mounted when inserted into the dock. The CineFlash is less tolerant of being removed from the dock (disconnected from the computer) than a typical USB drive. Therefore, you should ALWAYS unmount the CineFlash before removing it from the dock or disconnecting the dock from the computer if it has a CineFlash in it. This ensures that all data is written and flushed to the disk before removing the drive.

Users can access, play, edit and save the cine files using Phantom PCC or the Phantom CineViewer software (Windows only). To view and play the cines on a Mac, the GlueTools Phantom Cine plugin is recommended and is available from GlueTools.com.

Can I power the CineFlash Dock from the eSata or USB3 port?

No, you must power the CineFlash Dock using the included power supply.

Can I play cines stored on the CineFlash while it is still in the camera?

Using PCC, you can select any cine stored on the CineFlash while it is in the camera. Once selected, you can play that cine in PCC, trim it, adjust it and save it over Ethernet to the computer. You cannot, however, play the cine over the NTSC/PAL, or HD-SDI (M320S only) port using PVP.

Can you download from the CineFlash directly from the camera?

Yes using PCC.

How fast can I move files from the CineFlash to a disk drive using the CineFlash Dock?

The CineFlash Dock allows for Cine files to be saved via the Dock’s eSATA or USB3 connection to a drive connected to a PC or Mac with the appropriate EXT2 drivers. The write speeds will depend on the drive speed but will usually range between 120-250 MB/s.  Files downloaded via the camera body using PCC will typically be slower due to the Ethernet connection. 

How quickly can I save data from camera RAM to a CineFlash?

The CineFlash can save data at about 4 GB/minute (about 65 MB/second). So, a 4GB file will take about one minute. A 6GB file will take a little over 1.5 minutes. A 12GB file, about 3 minutes.

What can I expect for run times with the BP-U30 and BP-U60 battery?

Up to 45 minutes for the BP-U30 and 90 minutes for the BP-U60. Of course, this depends a lot upon camera usage—frame rates, cycle time between shots, etc. We will continue to characterize this and update the FAQ as we gather more data from different cameras in different applications. These run-times were determined without the EOS lens mount. We expect that using the adjustment features of the EOS mount (aperture and focus) will decrease battery run time.

Is there any way to tell the state of the battery as far as run time remaining?

There is a battery capacity indicator on the battery (you push a button and some LEDs tell you the approximate charge remaining.) This does not give you run time directly, but some indication of the battery state.

Does the camera charge the battery?

No, the camera does not charge a connected battery. The battery must be charged using the external charger.

What do the LEDs on the back of the camera indicate?

The LED indicators provide you with a visual representation of the camera's operational state, and communication status.

Power Indicator

The Power LED, located between the Capture and Power connectors on the right-hand side of the camera's rear panel near the center, provides a visual indication of camera power status and firmware integrity. If power is being supplied to the camera, and this LED is not lit, it indicates an error has occurred in the camera firmware. If this happens, it is best to reboot the camera to correct the error.

Capture Indicator

The Capture LED, located just below the Power Mode Switch on the right-hand side of the camera’s rear panel, near the bottom, provides a visual indication of the camera's operational states. By factory default, the camera is placed into the Preview - Waiting for Pre-trigger mode when the camera is powered on, unless it has otherwise been user-configured to start in the Recording waiting for trigger (capture) mode. Once in the Capture mode the camera starts recording images into the camera’s circular memory buffer (DRAM). Upon detection of a trigger signal, the camera is instructed to stop writing to the cameras internal memory buffer, once the number of specified Post Trigger frames has been reached, and the camera will be placed into the Preview mode. If the camera has been configured to automatically save the images to Flash the camera will, at this point write the images stored in the cameras DRAM to the Flash module.

User intervention is required to either save the cine to an external drive, or to put the camera back into the capture mode from the Setup and Recording screen.

The following will indicate the camera's operational state described above:

Off         Preview or Preview - Waiting for Trigger

On         Recording waiting for trigger (capture)

Ethernet Activity Indicator

When active the Ethernet Activity LED, the second of two LEDs located just above the Ethernet connector on the top right-hand side of the camera’s rear panel, indicates data is being transferred between the camera and the Phantom Control Unit computer.

Ethernet Link Indicator

When active the Ethernet Link LED, the second of two LEDs located just above the Ethernet connector on the top right-hand side of the camera’s rear panel, indicates that the camera is detected and is connected to an Ethernet network.

Phantom CineFlash Recording Indicator

The Phantom CineFlash Recording Indicator located inside the CineFlash Compartment near the bottom, will be active (red) when image data is being saved to the CineFlash. Do not remove the CineFlash during this process.

What signals are available via the ‘Capture’ port?

The Miro Mini-BOB and older capture cable both provide access to the following signals:  IRIG-IN, READY, VIDEO, TRIGGER, IRIG-OUT and AUX.  The AUX signal can be assigned in PCC as one of the following signals: EVENT, STROBE or MEMGATE

Can I use a capture cable from a Miro eX4 with the Miro M / R/ LC-Series?

Yes, but some signals are different.

eX4                    Miro M / R / LC-Series

IRIG-IN               IRIG-IN
Ready                Ready
Video                 Video
Trigger              Trigger
F-SYNC             IRIG-OUT
AUX(1)               AUX(2)

Note 1: Selectable between Strobe, IRIG-OUT
Note 2: Selectable between Strobe, Event, Memgate

When using the optional C-mount, what resolution is compatible with a 1” C-mount lens?

On the Miro 110 or 310  you can achieve 640x480 with a 1” C-mount lens. On 120, 320, 140 and 340 models you can achieve 1280 x 960 or roughly a 1152 x 1152 resolution.  

Why can’t I select any resolution I want? For example, if I type in a desired resolution of 1000 x 700, the software changes it to 1024 x 704.

All high-speed cameras have “native resolutions” based on the internal design of the sensor and camera. On Phantom cameras, the legal increments for horizontal and vertical resolution are called “Continuously Adjustable Resolution” or CAR. On the v1210 and v1610, CAR is 128 x 16. This means that the camera will always acquire images at integer multiples of 128 for the horizontal resolution and 16 for the vertical resolution.

In the past, we allowed the user to select any arbitrary resolution, then internally and “behind the scenes” selected the appropriate native resolution. Starting with the v1210 and v1610, we’ve decided to always show you what resolution we are using inside the camera.

If you need a final cine that has a non-native resolution, you can use the crop or scale features of PCC to get exactly what you need.

In the past, when I set up the camera to take multiple cines, each cine could have its own settings. Now, all the cines must share common settings. Why?

The Miro M / R / LC-Series cameras are built on a new firmware platform that no longer supports individual settings for each cine in a multi-cine environment.

What is the expected lifetime of a Phantom CineFlash?

If you can estimate the typical daily usage of the CineFlash, it is easy to estimate its expected lifetime.

The formula is: Years of CineFlash life = (Drive Size in GB * 20) / (GB Recorded per Day)

For example, if you plan to save 10 x 12GB files to a 120GB CineFlash each day, your estimated CineFlash lifetime is: (120 * 20) / (10 * 12) or 20 years. If you have the same daily usage but use a 60GB CineFlash, the lifetime is 10 years (and, you’ll need to remove some cines from the CineFlash at some point during the day.)

CineFlash lifetime is determined by the number of times you write to a specific memory location. The hardware in the CineFlash will automatically ensure that all memory cells are used equally across the CineFlash lifetime.

Note: Due to CineFlash formatting and bad block allocation, not all 120GB on a 120GB CineFlash will be available for user storage.

Phantom Miro LC Model Specific Collapse
What is the difference between the new LCxx1 cameras and the previous LCxx0 cameras?

There is one main difference between the two Miro LC versions.  The newer LCxx1 camera models use a 4.3” multi-touch surface capacitive touchscreen.   The original LCxx0 cameras used a 4” capacitive touchscreen.  They are similar, but the newer screens incorporate newer technology that will provide improved touch accuracy and better handheld performance. 

The other difference is the lack of physical buttons on the LCD window – one button was used to re-set the menu, which is no longer needed with the newer screens.  Just tap the center of the screen to bring up the menu.  The second button moved the on-screen menu display from the LCD panel to an external monitor (over SDI or NTSC/PAL).  This functionality still exists by using two fingers to expand the display off the screen and two fingers to bring the display back onto the side LCD screen.

Otherwise, all specs and menu options are exactly the same between the two versions.

What is the resolution and size of the touchscreen?

The native resolution of the Miro LC xx0 touchscreen is 800 x 480 pixels. 
The physical size is 4” diagonal, or 3.5 x 2.0” (87.5 x 52.5mm). 
Miro LCxx1 model screens are a bit larger at 4.3” with the same 800 x 480 pixel resolution.

Is the touchscreen resistive or capacitive?

The Miro LC uses a capacitive LCD touchscreen. Advantages of the capacitive screen include better sensitivity and accuracy of the human touch, and also better image rendition of the screen. Disadvantages include the inability to wear gloves or use other devices (like a stylus) to control the camera.

When running under battery power, the touchscreen seems to be less responsive. Why?

The touchscreen works best when the person controlling it is also touching the casing around or in back of the screen, or a metallic surface on the camera body. Some people will naturally draw more current than others when using a capacitive touchscreen, so the severity of this potential issue can differ between person to person. If you find this to be an issue, we recommend always holding the back or edge of the screen while controlling it, or touch any metallic surface on the camera with either hand.

This is not an issue when the camera is running on AC power.

The newer LCxx1 models will be easier to use on battery power than the previous LCxx0 camera models due to the newer screen technology.

Is it possible to re-set the touchscreen, in case it becomes less responsive over time?

LCxx0 models have physical buttons on the side of the screen  - the one marked with a square icon turns the menu display on and off.  When turning the menu off the screen automatically resets.  A good way to force the re-set is to double click that square button. The reset will take 5-10 seconds before you can access the controls again.


LCxx1 models do not have this physical re-set button because response issues are not expected. If you find issues with this, please contact the Vision Research support department.

Can you use a stylus with the Miro LC screen?

No, Vision Research has not identified a stylus to work with the Miro LC. The screen only responds to a human touch.

How well does the LCD screen work in daylight?

The screen has a glossy surface with sufficient brightness to work OK in bright sunlight. It is rated up to 40°C, however on hot sunny days we recommend keeping the screen out of direct sunlight as much as possible.

A handy feature on all LC cameras is threshold mode. Tap the top button on the front of the camera (autoset) to cycle through threshold, zoom, and live video tools. Threshold mode makes it easy to see the sections of the image that are overexposed.

Can saved Cine files in the CineFlash drive be reviewed on the LCD screen?

The camera’s menu system allows you to review the amount of takes on the CineFlash, their size, and the drive’s remaining capacity, however they can not be played back on the screen.  Files that are still in the camera’s RAM can however be played over video and on the screen. 

There are two ways to view and save stored Cine files from CineFlash drives.  The camera can be connected to Phantom PCC software via an Ethernet connection, or the drive can be mounted outside the camera via a CineFlash Dock where files can be viewed and saved over an eSata connection, from PC or Mac operating systems.

What does the "*" symbol next to a cine number on the cine list display mean?

This means that cine, in internal DRAM, has not yet been saved and will be lost if erased or if power is lost. Once the cine is saved to CineFlash, the asterisk will disappear.

Is there any way to select multiple cines for deletion or saving?

If you double tap on any cine in the cine list display, all cines with the same save state will be selected. This way you can save all unsaved cines, or delete all saved cines.

How can I cancel and reset the in-point or out-point that I set in the playback screen?

If you need to cancel your in- or out-point setting, just long-press on the mark-in or mark-out button.

Can I scrub through the video on the playback screen?

There is currently no "scrub" gesture, but subsequent presses on the play or rewind controls will increase the playback speed allowing you to do a fast-forward or fast-reverse playback.

Is there any difference in battery life between the M and LC-Series cameras?

The LCD screen on the side of the camera uses slightly more power, therefore battery life is slightly diminished. A BPU-30 battery provides about 45 minutes of battery life, where the BPU-60 provides about 90 minutes.

When I select a trigger point using a percentage number like 20%, the trigger is set 20% from the end of the available frames not 20% from the beginning. What is going on?

When selecting the trigger point using frames, you set the number of post-trigger frames. To be consistent with this, when using percent, you set the percentage of frames you want to be post-trigger, rather than pre-trigger.

Phantom Miro C110 Collapse
Can I use any Ethernet cable with the Miro C110?

Yes.  We include an Ethernet cable and a BNC cable with the camera, just to get you started.  But any Ethernet or BNC cable will work.

I have an old Miro power supply. Can I just use that one?

Unfortunately, no.   The connector is different, to keep it small enough to fit on the C110. 

Can I use my F-mount lens with the Miro C-Series cameras?

Yes, with a converter.  The Miro C’s come with a C lens mount that can be reversed to become a CS lens mount. To use an F-mount lens, you can purchase a converter (part number VRI-FMNT-CMNT). 

The C110 looks like the C210. Is it Hi-G? Can it be used with a Miro Junction Box?

The Miro C110 has many of the design features as the C210, and it is made to be rather tough.  However, it is not specified as a Hi-G camera, and cannot survive the same shocks and vibrations that the C210 can survive.  The C110 is not designed to work with a Miro Junction Box, and has different connectors

If the camera doesn’t have a shutter, how can I perform a Current Session Reference (CSR)?

The Miro C’s do not have a shutter, but you can still perform a CSR.  Just make sure you cover the lens before clicking the CSR button.

What are all of the available signals for the C110?

  • Trigger (dedicated BNC)
  • SDI (dedicated BNC)
  • F-Sync (I/O 1 default)
  • Strobe (I/O 2 default)
  • IRIG In
  • IRIG Out

What is the worst case power draw of the cameras?

The cameras draw only 12W during operation.

Phantom Miro C210/C210J Collapse
What is the difference between the Miro C210J and Miro C210?

The difference is in the connections. The Miro C210J must be operated through a system cable to the Miro Junction Box and does not have a separate power connector.  It is the perfect, lowest cost solution for a system of multiple connected cameras. The Miro C210 has the same 3 connectors as other Miros.  It can be powered and operated independently, or, with a Miro C Capture cable, it can also connect to the Miro Junction Box.

Otherwise, the Miro C210J and Miro C210 are the same.

Will my old Miro RCU cable work with the Miro C’s?

The Miro RCU cable (part number VRI-CBL-MIRO-RCU) can work with the Miro C’s, however it does not have a port for SDI.  Therefore, to see video, you need to connect the DIN and BNC cable from the front of the camera to the RCU. The Miro C RCU cable (part number VRI-CBL-MIROC-RCU) has an additional BNC port for SDI, making the connection more convenient.

Can I use my F-mount lens with the Miro C-Series cameras?

Yes, with a converter.  The Miro C’s come with a C lens mount that can be reversed to become a CS lens mount. To use an F-mount lens, you can purchase a converter (part number VRI-FMNT-CMNT). 

Does the breakout box work with these cameras? What signals are available?

The Miro C210J does not use a Breakout box, because it receives signaling from the JBox through the System cable. The Miro C210 can use the Breakout box, and in fact comes with the Mini-Breakout box (part number VRI-MINI-BOB). 

The signals available to both cameras are:

Trigger 
Video (through DIN 1.0/2.3 connector on front of camera) 
IRIG In 
IRIG Out 
F-Sync 
Ready 
Strobe  
Event 
Memgate

What is the worst case power draw of the cameras?

The cameras draw 18W while the batteries are charging. Otherwise, they draw only 12W during operation.

Phantom Miro 140 and 340 Model Specific Collapse
What is the difference between the Phantom Miro 140 and the Phantom Miro 120?

There are two important differences. The 140 has a 4 Mpx sensor with a resolution of 2560 x1600. The 120 has a 2Mpx sensor with a resolution of 1920x1200. Secondly, the 140 has no video output from the camera. (The 120 has NTSC or PAL video out.) You must use PCC or 3rd party camera control software to view images (live or recorded.) For this reason, the camera is usually used in tethered applications under computer control, often in 3rd party solutions for PIV or DIC. Other than these two differences, the cameras are identical.

What is the difference between the Phantom Miro 340 and the Phantom Miro 320S?

There are two important differences. The 340 has a 4 Mpx sensor with a resolution of 2560 x 1600. The 320S has a 2Mpx sensor with a resolution of 1920 x1200. Secondly, the M340 has no video output from the camera. (The 320S has HD-SDI video out.) You must use PCC or 3rd party camera control software to view images (live or recorded.) For this reason, the camera is usually used in tethered applications under computer control, often in 3rd party solutions for PIV or DIC. Other than these two differences, the cameras are identical.

If the Miro 140 and 340 don't have video output, how do I frame, focus and review recording?

You must use images that are sent over the Gb Ethernet port to software hosted on a computer for framing, focusing and viewing playback. An obvious solution is to use PCC running on a PC connected to the camera. However, there are other alternatives such as LabView (using the Phantom SDK and LabView drivers), as well as 3rd party camera control solutions.

Can I use the Phantom RCU with the Phantom Miro140 and Phantom Miro 340?

The RCU would not make a good controller for these cameras. The reason is the lack of video output from the camera to the RCU would mean you were "flying blind". You would not be able to see the live image on the RCU screen to frame and focus your shot, for example.

Miro LAB-Series Specific Collapse
How does the Miro LAB differ from other Miro models?

The Miro LAB is designed for office-like environments such as you’d see in many laboratories, classrooms, etc. So, the LAB uses industry standard connectors for Ethernet and I/O instead of the more ruggedized custom connectors found on the M-, R-, and LC-Series. 

Also, in an office-like environment, there is good assurance of reliable AC power, so we have eliminated the battery backup feature on the LAB-Series. Finally, since the camera is always used in a computer-tethered workflow, there is no need for a video monitor or remote control access. Otherwise, it inherits all the features and proven design of the Miro Family of cameras.

There is no capture cable or Break-out-Box for the LAB-Series. How do I access the signals for controlling or monitoring the camera?

There are four BNC connectors on the camera that provide programmable signaling:

I/O-1: This is the same as Aux1 on some of our other cameras and you can choose for it to be FSYNC, Event, Strobe or Memgate in PCC. It is called "Aux 1" in PCC.

I/O-2: This is the same as Aux2 on some of our other cameras and you can choose for it to be Ready or Strobe. It is called "Aux 2" in PCC.

I/O-1 and I/O-2 can be programmed in the Camera Signals control pane of PCC.

There is a dedicated IRIG-IN BNC

And, there is a dedicated Trigger In BNC

Note: There is no IRIG-OUT signal on the LAB-Series so it cannot be used as an IRIG source. Also, there is no analog or digital video output.

Does the LAB-Series support the CineFlash storage system?

Yes! However, unlike the other Miro Family members, a CineFlash, and CineFlash Dock do not come bundled with the camera. A kit containing these items is available as are individual items as needed.

What is the difference between the LAB310 and the LAB3a10?

We have feedback from customers about the need for a 1 megapixel camera with smaller pixels than the 20 micron pixels on the LAB310. Smaller pixels have advantages in some applications. So, we invented an “alternate” (thus the “a”) 1 Mpx camera.

The LAB3a10, in fact, is a 1.6 Mpx camera with a maximum resolution of 1280 x 1280. The square aspect ratio is also an advantage in many imaging applications. Now, you can choose whichever 1 Mpx camera best meets your needs. Your sales representative can give you more details about the advantages and disadvantages of large versus small pixels.

The LAB3a10 at 1280 x 1280 and with 10 micron pixels, has an image circle that is greater than 18 mm diameter. What lensing can I use to cover that area?

Sensor coverage will only be a consideration if you have a C-mount on the camera. The other mounts—Canon EOS, Nikon F and PL, support 35 mm lenses and cover the sensor easily. However, a standard 1” C-mount lens may vignette, especially at shorter focal lengths.

We recommend the use of a 4/3” C-mount lens with the LAB3a10 when equipped with a C-mount. We have a selection of five different focal length 4/3” lenses from KOWA available. These and other 4/3” C-mount lenses are readily available from a variety of sources.

Phantom Flex4K Collapse
I already own a Flex4K - how do I start working with ProRes and Audio?

These new features can be enabled with a free firmware and software upgrade, which is available on our website. Visit the Support section of this website and locate the Flex4K to download the firmware and instructions.

Working with ProRes simply requires a CineMag IV to record to.  Select ProRes 422 HQ from the CineMag menu of the camera, or in PCC.  Working with Audio requires the use of a digitizer, such as the Sound Devices MixPre-D, to supply an AES / EBU signal to the camera.

Currently, all ProRes and Audio files on a CineMag IV must be downloaded using Windows-based Phantom PCC software.   If you are working with a Mac, we recommend running PCC via Bootcamp.

What are some differences between the RAW and ProRes workflow?

Activate ProRes recording using the CineMag menu on the Flex4K or in the Flash Memory menu in PCC.  Select between Cine Raw (Packed 10) and ProRes 422 HQ as format options.

Resolution:  When working with ProRes, the camera must be set to full sensor resolution 4096 x 2304 only. ProRes files can be saved to the CineMag as 4K or scaled 2K resolution.  The CineMag IV will not support any other resolutions to record when set to ProRes.  In LOOP mode, you can still capture to RAM at other resolutions, but the recording will default to RAW when saved to the CineMag.

Frame rates and save times:  In Run/Stop (RS) mode the camera will allow up to 30 fps direct to the CineMag.  In LOOP mode, the camera will allow up to 938 fps to RAM, before the file is saved to the CineMag.  Saving in ProRes HQ mode takes about 3 times longer to the CineMag than saving RAW.   The files in the mag are about 2.5X smaller than the un-interpolated RAW files, and take that much shorter to save from the camera or CineStation IV.  

Over 5 hours of 24 fps ProRes HQ footage can be stored on a 2TB CineMag IV.

Video playback from the camera body:  The camera body will allow for HDSDI video playback of the ProRes files, however it’s a little different than working with RAW.  The camera must load the files for playback, which takes about 5 seconds.  During this 5 second “switchover” the word “loading” is on the camera menu. This process will happen automatically each time a ProRes file is recorded into the mag or playback is initiated.

Also unique to ProRes playback are the supported video formats.  1080p, 1080psf and 4Kp video modes allow for playback at ZOOM: fit and ZOOM: 1 settings.   1080psf playback actually switches to 1080p during ProRes playback, then switches back to psf for live monitoring and RAW playback.   

Not supported are 1080i, 720p modes, anamorphic settings and larger zoom settings. 

Why is the only option ProRes 422 HQ? Will additional ProRes formats and resolutions be added?

Vision Research chose to enable ProRes 422 HQ as the initial format, based on the inherent quality and compression value when compared to Cine Raw files.  We feel that if higher quality is required, then Cine RAW is still an acceptable option.  And lower quality formats are more likely used in addition to the Cine RAW, which are better left to be converted outside of the camera.

We will consider adding formats and resolutions at a later date. However, no guarantee or time frame can be stated at this time.

How does Flex4K audio recording work?

An AES/EBU signal is fed into the AES input on the MiniBob or Sync/Capture cable that came with the original Flex4K purchase.  Audio works at sync-sound frame rates and above.  Audio must be converted from analog to digital AES/EBU using a digitizer, such as the Sound Devices MixPre-D. 

Audio is enabled with the audio menu on the camera body, and levels are provided on the camera menu by scrolling right with the select knob. 

When enabled, audio gets recorded as a separate file with each cine, in both RAM and CineMag.  The files are downloaded from PCC as uncompressed .wav files with can be matched with the video in post processing.   The wav files are 48KHz at up to 24-bit, and the camera supports re-sampling of other frequencies. 

Audio can be monitored from the camera live using the headphone jack on the camera body or more accurately with the AES out via the Aux2 port on the Minibob.  At sync-sound frame rates (matching with video rates) the camera will play back the audio from the camera RAM. When not matched the camera will not provide audio playback.  Audio playback is not supported from the CineMag at this time.

What frame rates are possible with Flex4K when with direct record to CineMag in R/S mode?

When running the camera in Run/Stop (R/S) mode the frame rate is limited based on the resolution and the size of the CineMag IV. 

Some common resolutions are: 

Maximum FPS direct to the 2TB CineMag IV:
4096x2304 @ 120 FPS 
4096x2160 @ 128 FPS
2048x1080 @ 256 FPS

Maximum FPS direct to the 1TB CineMag IV: 
4096x2304 @ 96 FPS 
4096x2160 @ 102 FPS
2048x1080 @ 204 FPS

When the camera is set to record ProRes HQ in R/S mode the camera will record up to 30 fps at full 4K resolution only

A record time calculator can be found in the 'Support / Resources & Tools' section of our website, as well as in the "Phantom Tools" iOS App, which lets you estimate the maximum frame rate and record time at any given resolution.  With the Flex4K selected, choose the appropriate CineMag memory size in order to simulate recording direct to that CineMag.

Record Time Calculator page

What are the main differences between the Phantom Flex and Flex4K?

The most obvious difference is the pixel resolution: The original Phantom Flex (aka Flex 2K), has a 2.5K sensor and the Flex4K has a full 4K sensor. There are many other differences, which we have tried to capture here:

Recording media

The Flex (2K) uses the CineMag or CineMag II non-volatile magazines. These mount to the top of the camera.

The Flex4K uses a new CineMag design, called the Phantom CineMag IV. The CineMag IV is available in 1TB and 2TB memory sizes. They mount in the side camera enclosure of the Flex4K, and are not compatible with the earlier cameras.

In both cases, Raw Cine files are transferred from RAM (or recorded directly) at speeds over 800 Mpx/second.  The CineMag IV enables ProRes recording to save space and increase total record time.

Image properties

The Flex (2K) has a maximum resolution of 2560 x 1600 on a super 35mm CMOS sensor. The pixel size is 10 microns. The Flex4K is also super-35mm but with a full resolution of 4096 x 2304 and with  6.75 micron pixels.

The dynamic range is higher, and the overall noise level of the Flex4K is significantly lower than the Flex (2K).

The base sensitivity of the Flex4K is ISO 250T, and the exposure index can extend the image up to over 1000 (ISO equivalent) without significant loss of image quality. The Flex (2K) has a base sensitivity of ISO 1000T, but we don’t recommend pushing the exposure index on that camera in order to maintain the optimum image quality.

Another difference is that the Flex4K has a progressive scan shutter (with less than 1ms scan time), and the Flex (2K) has a global shutter.

Regarding color processing, the Flex4K operates from the newer Phantom protocol, which lets you set the white balance in Kelvin as opposed to RGB gains like previous Phantom cameras.  Powerful image processing controls like tone curves and color matrix are also possible with the Flex4K.

On-camera controls

The Flex (2K) has basic controls on the left side of the camera. The camera needs to be connected to a viewfinder or monitor to see the menu and settings change.

The Flex4K has similar controls on the left side, but on the right side there is a new full menu system that lets you control every setup and control parameter of the camera. This full menu is displayed on a built-in LCD screen.

Power & battery control

The Flex (2K) has two 24-volt power inputs. One can be used as the main AC power (220 watt power supply), and the other can be connected to a stand battery to use as a battery backup. OR, power the camera with a stand battery (like the Anton Bauer VCLX series)

The Flex4K has one 24-volt power input, and three standard battery backs are available that support Hawk-Woods, V-Lock and AB-Gold mount batteries. When using 14.4 volts only high-capacity batteries are recommended.    

Video features

The Flex (2K) has two 1.5G HD-SDI outputs and one component video signal, and they all output an identical scaled 1080p or 720p output.  The two outputs can work together to provide a 4:4:4 1080p signal. 

The Flex4K has three main HDSDI outputs that can output at either 1.5G or 3G, and an additional SDI for viewfinder. Two of the outputs can be used together for a dual-link 4K signal.  The camera can be set to continuously monitor the live feed where 2 of the outputs play back what was captured to camera RAM or the CineMag IV.  The cameras outputs can also switch between Rec709 and Phantom LOG mode for monitoring purposes. 

How do you get the files off the CineMag IV?

Files in the CineMag IV can be downloaded through the Flex4K camera body or (more likely) through the Phantom CineStation IV.  The camera has 1Gb Ethernet only, where the CineStation IV offers both 1Gb Ethernet and 10Gb Ethernet connections.

The files can be downloaded using windows-based Phantom PCC software or with Mac-based Glue Tools Séance software. One license of Séance comes with the camera purchase, and is otherwise available for sale at www.gluetools.com

Will the original CineMag or CineMag II Work with the Phantom Flex4K?

No. The Flex4K has a completely new CineMag interface and will be compatible exclusively with the CineMag IV. It mounts in the side enclosure of the camera as opposed to the earlier CineMags, which mounts on top with a pogo-pin connection.

There are a lot of video outputs and options on the Flex4K. How do the different video modes work?

The camera has three main 3G HD-SDI outputs at the back, one additional 3G HD-SDI output and one component video output at the front for viewfinders, and one HD-SDI. The camera supports:  

    • 4:2:2 1.5G 1080p/psf at 23.9, 24, 25, 29.9 Hz; 720p at 50, 59.9 Hz
    • 4:2:2 3G 1080p 50 and 59.9 Hz
    • 4:4:4 3G 1080p/psf at 23.9, 24, 25, 29.9 Hz; 720p at 50, 59.9 Hz
    • Dual-link 4:4:4 3G 2160p 23.9, 24, 25 and 29.9 signals                                                                      

The three main outputs are separated as 1x monitor (MON) output, and 2x recording (REC) outputs.  The 2x REC outputs can be configured as individual 1080p outputs or used together to provide a dual-link 4K video output. All outputs must be on the same video system, and the 4K/2160p signal is determined by the settings of the other outputs / and vice versa.

The Component and HD-SDI viewfinder outputs (VF) at the front always work together, and provide the same image, with the same overlays, zoom modes, etc.  The MON output can also mirror the VF output - this should be a common setup.

Versatile HD-SDI: The VF outputs and MON output can be set to always show a live signal, where the REC outputs are a clean feed that will switch between live and playback. This allows the DP & camera operator to always monitor the live action while the camera is playing back the last shot, or reviewing CineMag IV takes through the REC outputs.

Video scaling: When capturing at 4K resolution and outputting at 1080p (for example) the camera will always scale the video to 1080p.

Monitoring & Log outputs: The Flex4K video outputs can be switched between Rec709 and Phantom Log mode. All outputs are grouped together to display the same output. Various zoom ratios can be set from the camera body to help set focus. Production area rectangles and threshold mode are also available for the VF and MON outputs to help judge framing and exposure.

How long can you record with the Flex4K?

The record time is completely dependent on the camera’s resolution, frame rate, and the size of memory that is being recorded to.  At the camera’s maximum resolution and frame rate the camera will capture 5 seconds of video to 64GB.  If recording directly to a 1TB CineMag at 96 FPS you can record for about 13 minutes.  At 24 FPS you can record for about 56 minutes. 

Visit our Record Time Calculator.

What is the size and weight of the Flex4K camera?

The camera body weighs in at 14 lbs (6.3kg) and the size is 11.5 x 5. x 7.9 in (LxWxH); 29.2 x 14 x 20cm.  It is roughly the size of the original Flex.

Download the Flex4K Mechanical Drawing

Phantom Flex Collapse
What are the benefits of over sampling and using image scaling?

There are two main benefits from oversampling on the Phantom Flex camera:

  1. When shooting at full resolution of 2560x1600 (or 2560x1440 for 16:9 aspect ratio), the active sensor area (25.6mm x 16.0mm) is very close to the size of a 35mm film frame – meaning, when using 35mm lenses, you will get the field-of-view and depth-of-view you have come to expect with 35mm cameras.
  2. When an over-sampled image is scaled to HD, the scaling process tends to reduce noise and increase dynamic range. Scaling can be done automatically in-camera for the video signals from the camera, and it can be done in post-production using compatible tools.

What is the "field replaceable pin array" included with my Phantom Flex?

Unfortunately, in the fast-paced and sometimes hectic production environment, sufficient care is not used when putting a CineMag onto a camera. The result can be bent or broken pins on the CineMag interface. On previous cameras, this could bring the production to a halt and the camera had to be returned to Vision Research for service. 

On the Phantom Flex, this can be easily fixed by replacing the pin array assembly on the camera – and, it is an end-user repair. A spare pin array assembly is included with the camera, and a damaged one can be returned to Vision Research for replacement for a nominal fee.

The Flex datasheet refers to a “low fan mode for near silent shooting”. What is this and how do I access this mode?

When the Phantom Flex camera is used at “normal” speeds where sound recording may also be used, it is important that it is as quiet as possible. While the new dual-fan cooling system on the Phantom Flex runs very quiet, the fans are automatically slowed down and become even quieter when shooting in HQ mode AND while recording directly to the CineMag. This is the most likely recording scenario where synchronized sound is also recorded. At all other times (in Standard mode and in loop recording) the fans will run at whatever speed is required to keep the camera at a constant temperature.

Even in the quiet mode, if the camera temperature begins to exceed limits that we’ve set to protect the camera circuitry, the fans will speed up. Typically, this will not occur except for very, very long takes.

What is the difference between the Dual-Link HD-SDI feature of the Phantom Flex, and the Versatile Dual HD-SDI feature on the v640, v12.1 and v710?

The Versatile Dual HD-SDI  feature of the v640, v12.1 and v710 allows the user to have a live image on one of the two HD-SDI ports on the camera while playing back a stored cine on the other port at the same time. This is a feature that is critical in sports broadcast replay applications.

The camera operator can always be looking at or recording the live action, while the controllers in an OB truck (for example) can be viewing, saving or even airing a slow-motion playback stored in the camera.  This feature, in addition to true HD resolution and great light sensitivity is what has propelled the v640 into the position as the most popular ultra-slow-motion broadcast camera.

Dual-link HD-SDI is a video system which has two HD-SDI outputs, which always have the same content on them – either live OR playback. They can be configured to provide two 4:2:2 video feeds of identical content, or they can be “combined” to provide a 4:4:4 video feed for maximum video quality. (4:4:4 is typically not available at 60fps playback.)

Dual-link HD-SDI is available on all of our camera with two HD-SDI video ports and is the functionality available on the Phantom Flex.

When should I use the Flex camera’s HQ mode, and what are the trade-offs?

HQ mode uses a proprietary technology to enhance each frame of your shot. Each frame is analyzed for noise and image artifacts that can occur under continuously changing shooting environments. Using HQ mode means that you will always get the best images possible even when changing frame rates, exposure settings, resolution, or if ambient and camera temperatures are changing. 

Use this mode when you are changing camera settings often or working in an ever-changing physical environment and when you need your last shot of the day to look just as good as your first shot. HQ mode reduces maximum frame rates by about ½ and each frame requires twice the internal camera memory. However, saved cine files are the same size as in Standard Mode and recording directly to CineMag has the same speed and size specifications as Standard Mode.

If you find yourself in an application where you need very, very short exposure times, you may need to use Standard mode. In HQ mode, the Phantom Flex uses some of the time during the frame acquisition to enhance the image for that frame. This time is not available for digital exposure. So, the exposure times in HQ mode are a bit more limited than in Standard mode. See the FAQ on this topic for more explanation.

Why are the exposure times available to me in HQ mode different from what is available in Standard mode on the Phantom Flex?

In Standard mode you can shoot with exposure times as short as 1 microsecond. That is very close to a 0 degree shutter angle! You might need that in rare situations where you are trying to stop all motion blur and you have enough light to shoot at extremely small exposures.

The HQ mode needs time to do the frame-specific image enhancements that are key to the mode. And, it needs to do this as the frame is acquired. The time it takes for these enhancements is not available to the camera as digital exposure time. The greater the frame rate, the less time there is for digital exposure. At the maximum frame rate for any resolution in HQ mode, the exposure time is limited to about ½ of 1/frames-per-second or a 180 degree shutter angle. As you lower the frame rate, the available time increases so that at 24 fps (for example), the range is 7 degrees to 353 degrees.

If you find that the minimum available exposure in HQ mode is insufficient to “stop motion” and you have unacceptable motion blur, you will need to switch to Standard mode. This will be a very rare situation. At 1920x1080 in HQ mode the minimum exposure will be about 300 microseconds, generally good enough to stop motion for most applications.

Phantom Software Collapse
Why does the overall PCC display layout appear re-arranged on different computers?

The Phantom software might look different based on the screen resolution of your monitor. We rearranged the software components to maximize the space for the resolution of your monitor.

Does Phantom software work with Mac computers? Or, only PCs?

Phantom PCC control and download software is designed and maintained by Vision Research and works with modern Windows operating systems.  There is no native Mac control software at this time. 

Though not supported by Vision Research, many customers have had success running PCC on a Mac by running windows using Apple Boot Camp and following the standard PCC network configuration instructions.

Glue Tools Séance is a good solution for Mac users looking to download Cine files from a CineMag.  Note: Séance is not a control software, it is Mac-specific software for Cine file download only.  Seance can be purchased from www.gluetools.com

What is a Cine file?

cine file is the name we give to the Vision Research proprietary file that holds the images in the camera memory. The file can be written to a disk drive and then read and manipulated with the Vision Research Phantom Software. The file format is "lossless" meaning all of the sensor data is available without any compromise or compression.

If you save the file as cine RAW, the file contains the uninterpolated raw sensor data.

If you save as just a cine file, the file contains RGB information for each pixel interpolated from the raw sensor data.

How to work with Cine Raw files in Adobe Premiere

The 2015 release of Adobe Premiere Pro CC has native Cine Raw compatibility for Flex4K and color Cine Raw files from newer Phantom cameras such as the Miro M, R, LC, LAB, C and all UHD (VXX1X) cameras.  

Phantom Flex (2K), HD, v64X, older cameras and monochrome cameras will import but the white balance may not be correct. If this is the case we recommend converting to a compatible format such as Apple ProRes using PCC or by using the GlueTools Plug-in on Mac. 

How do I convert a Cine movie to other video formats?

It’s easy to convert a raw Cine file to other video formats using PCC or Phantom Viewer software.  Files can be opened individually, or batches of files can be processed with the batch-cine convert tool in PCC.  In the ‘Play’ / ‘Save’ dialogue there are a series of file formats available to you.  

Popular video formats are .mp4 with H264 compression, .avi with different codecs, and the various Apple ProRes .mov formats.  The Cine can also be converted to a series of still images in formats such as TIFF, JPEG and DPX format.  

When converting to a batch of stills, a naming convention is required.  For example, type the desired file name followed by the ‘+’ sign and a number that corresponds to the number of digits required to accommodate the file.  A 1000-frame file would require the naming convention “test+4” 
Each frame will now be saved in a folder as “test0001.dpx” “test0002.dpx” “test0003.dpx” and so forth. 

Other naming conventions exist for different scenarios. Refer to the PCC software manual for further instructions. 

How do I batch process cine files into image sequences (i.e TIFF, DPX, DNG)?

On the upper left part of the PCC task bar, click the “Batch convert files” icon.  Navigate to the folder and hold down the Shift key or Control key to select the desired files. 

When converting any number of cine files to a batch of stills, a naming convention is required.  For example, type the desired file name followed by the ‘+’ sign and a number that corresponds to the number of digits required to accommodate the file.  A 1000-frame file requires the naming convention “+4”

Each image batch will be saved in a new, unique folder that retains the Cine file name and the frames are saved as (for example):   “test0001.dpx” “test0002.dpx” “test0003.dpx” and so forth.

Other naming conventions exist for different scenarios. Refer to the PCC software manual for further instructions.
 

What is the best digital / raw workflow to use with Final Cut Pro?

The best way is to use the Quicktime plugin from Glue Tools. Installing this plugin allows you to open Phantom® Cine files in Quicktime or any compatible application. You can even drag cine files directly onto the FCP timeline and edit them without rendering.

Here is an alternate way to get Phantom Cine files into Final Cut Pro for editing:

  1. Use "Process and Convert" in the Phantom software to create a directory that contains sequential TIFF files, each file representing a frame in the cine. You can find detailed instructions on how to do this elsewhere on this web site or in the Phantom software help, but in summary: create a new directory (named appropriately), select the cine you want to convert, choose to save it as a TIFF 16/48 for maximum bit-depth preservation, set the destination to the new directory and the filename to "frame+5". Be sure to do this onto an NTFS formatted external disk connected to the PC.
  2. When the convert process is done, move the external disk to the Macintosh computer and mount it. Optionally (but recommended) copy the whole directory to a Mac volume.
  3. Use Quicktime Pro on the Mac to "Open the Image Sequence" by navigating to the directory and selecting the first TIFF frame. You will need to decide what your "play" frame rate will be at this point. Do "Save As..." and be sure to save the exported movie as a reference movie. You won't be able to save into the same folder as your TIFF files unless you moved that folder to a Mac disk drive. However, that is a good idea, that way your reference movie and all the frames it points to are in a single directory on the Mac.
  4. Launch Final Cut Pro and do "File --> Import --> Files..." and select the reference movie you just created. You now have that clip in FCP, ready for editing.
  5. But first, go to your sequence settings and create a setting that matches the resolution of the cine and be sure to select the "TIFF" compressor. This will give you a "real time" timeline that avoids rendering during editing. (Of course if you apply any filters, etc. you will need to render.)
  6. When you are done editing, color correcting, etc. render the file and export it as a Quicktime (not a reference file), with no compression.
  7. You can now use Compressor, Sorenson Squeeze or Telestream Episode to convert your movie to any desired formats and compression schemes. The Quicktime movie is your master.

How can I save / convert a single image from the video captured by the Phantom digital high speed camera?

It’s easy to capture a single image from a Cine file using the Phantom software.  The best way to do this is to hit the ‘DISPLAY’ button from the Cine playback screen. When you close out of the playback window the displayed image will be there, ready to be saved in a variety of formats.

Why is MPEG conversion no longer available on later versions of the Phantom software?

MPEG 1 and 2 have been removed from the current versions of Phantom software due to licensing issues. Cine Raw, Cine, Cine JPEG, AVI, Multi Page Tiff, MXF (PAL and NTSC) and QuickTime are currently available for conversion. A common workaround is to convert the Cine file into a QuickTime movie, then export the file to MPEG-4 format using QuickTime Pro.

Miro Junction Box Collapse
Which cameras can I use with the Miro Junction Box?

The Miro Junction Box (JBox) accepts all Miro cameras – The Miro C210J uses a System Cable, all other Miro cameras require a Miro C Capture Cable.  Please note that the Miro JBox cannot accept other Phantom cameras.  We have the Multi I/O for that.

If JBoxes are connected together, how many power sources are needed?

ach JBox needs its own power source, such as a power supply, even if they are connected together.

Canon EOS Lens Mount Collapse
What camera lenses are compatible with your Canon EOS Lens Mount?

Below is a list of lenses that we have tested with the Phantom Cameras.  If you have additional lenses that you have used with the EOS Lens mount and would like to share with us or you would like to request a lens to be added, please send your feedback/request with the specific manufacturer's P/N to support@visionresearch.com
 

Lenses Tested with the Canon EOS Lens Mount*

LensVision Research Product IDCanon Part NumberSigma Part Number
100 - 400mm  f4.5  VRI-L100-400C-F4.5-EOS2577A002AAN / A
100mm f2.0 VRI-L100C-F2.0-EOS2518A003  N / A
10 - 20mm  f3.5 VRI-L10-20S-F3.5-EOS N / A 201-101
 105mm  f2.8 EX DG MacroVRI-L105S-F2.8-EOS  N / A 257-101
135mm  f2.0 VRI-L135C-F2.0-EOS  2520A004 N / A
 14mm  f2.8VRI-L14C-F2.8-EOS 2045B002  N / A
16 - 35mm  f2.8 VRI-L16-35C-F2.8-EOS  1910B002AA N / A
 17 - 50mm  f2.8VRI-L17-50S-F2.8-EOS    N / A583-101
200mm  f2.0  VRI-L200C-F2-EOS 2297B002N / A
24 - 70mm f2.8  VRI-L24-70C-F2.8-EOS8014A002 N / A
24 - 70mm f2.8VRI-L24-70S-F2.8-EOS  N / A  571-101
 24mm f1.4 Wide Angle VRI-L24C-F1.4-EOS2750B002N / A
35mm  f1.4  VRI-L35C-F1.4-EOS 2512A002N / A 
35mm  f2.0  VRI-L35C-F2.0-EOS2507A002 N / A
 50mm  f1.2 VRI-L50C-F1.2-EOS 1257B002AA N / A
 50mm  f1.4 VRI-L50C-F1.4-EOS 2515A003 N / A 
 50mm  f1.8VRI-L50-F1.8-EOS 2514A002 N / A
 600mm  f4 VRI-L600-F4-EOS 5125B002 N / A
65mm f2.8 VRI-L65C-F2.8-EOS 2540B002  N / A
70 - 200mm f2.8  VRI-L70-200C-F2.8-EOS2569A004  N / A
 70 - 200mm  f2.8VRI-L70-200S-F2.8-EOS  N / A589-101 
 8 - 16mm Ultra Wide  f4.5 VRI-L8-16S-F4.5-EOS    N / A 203-101
85mm  f1.2VRI-L85C-F1.2-EOS1056B002AA N / A


*Please contact your Vision Research sales representative for details including pricing.

Phantom Remote Control Unit (RCU) Collapse
Are there two types of Bluetooth dongles? What are the differences?

Prior to introduction of the Flex4K in 2014 the Bluetooth dongle was larger and had an external antenna.  The current version of the Bluetooth dongle is smaller, fits on all Phantom products with the ‘Remote’ port, and has an internal antenna.  Both dongles work the same, however the older one does not physically connect to the Flex4K.

How do I connect my RCU to an older v-Series camera that does not have a Remote port?

Older v-Series cameras such as the v7.3, v9.1 and v10 are compatible with the RCU by using a Phantom Break-out Box (BOB) with RCU connector and appropriate cable.  The BOB-RCU connects to the camera with the 19-pin Amphenol capture connector.   There is also a Bluetooth version of the BOB for wireless control.

How do I connect the RCU to Miro cameras?

The RCU receives power and signal through the power port on Miro M, R, LC, LAB and C camera models.  A Miro-RCU kit is available that provides a place to connect the AC adapter and the RCU cable. The part number is: VRI-RCU-KIT-MIRO-M

When the camera is powered with battery power, the camera will not power the RCU which must use its own battery.  When the camera is powered by the AC adapter and the appropriate cabling is used, the RCU is powered by the camera’s AC adapter.

Miro 110, 111, 310, 311, 120, 121 and 320 models all have NTSC/PAL video transmitted through the Miro Cable.  When using 320S, 321S models and C210 cameras, SDI video must be connected separately using the BNC connectors on both devices.  

Miro LAB cameras and 140, 141, 340 and 341 models do not have any video signal (video is displayed through Ethernet using PCC), so the RCU must be used for control only.

How far can the Phantom Bluetooth Module transmit data?

The transmission range of the Bluetooth dongle varies a lot depending on the environment.  When used in a straight line without many obstructions or other wireless interference the Bluetooth range can be over 100 meters, or 300 feet.  However, in an environment with electronic interference and physical obstructions the range will be less, but usually still at least up to 30 meters.  

Is there a way to use the wireless RCU with a Miro?

Phantom Miro cameras have no Remote port, and as such the Bluetooth-Dongle is not directly compatible or supported.  However, a third-party solution exists – it is manufactured by Abel Cine.  This involves the Abel Cine Miro-BOB, a top and bottom mounting plate and an additional power source.  Link to product:  

Will my old Miro RCU cable work with Miro C-Series cameras?

The Miro RCU cable (part number VRI-CBL-MIRO-RCU) can work with the Miro C’s, however it does not have a port for SDI.  Therefore, to see video, you need to connect the DIN and BNC cable from the front of the camera to the RCU. The Miro C RCU cable (part number VRI-CBL-MIROC-RCU) has an additional BNC port for SDI, making the connection more convenient.

Phantom CineMag and CineStation Collapse
I understand there are several models of CineMag – What are the differences?


The CineMag was created to securely and efficiently save the raw data from the camera RAM as quickly as possible.  Besides moving files from RAM, the camera can also record directly to a CineMag in “Run/Stop” mode at lower frame rates for several minutes. Cine Raw files are stored in a 10-bit packed LOG format. 

There are officially three different types of CineMag, listed below along with a camera compatibility chart.  
 

The CineMag-II replaced the original CineMag in a smaller, lighter package.  The CineMag IV was created in conjunction with the Flex4K and they available in larger capacities.

 

CineMag Compatibility Chart

Model

Original CineMag

CineMag-II

CineMag IV

Available sizes

256GB, 512GB

144GB, 256GB, 512GB

1TB, 2TB

Phantom v-411, 711, 64X, etc

X

X

 

Phantom HD/65

X

X

 

Phantom vXX10 and VXX11

 

X

 

Phantom Flex (2K)

X

X

 

Phantom UHS-12 (VXX12)

 

 

X

Phantom Flex4K

 

 

X

Are there any portable 10Gb Ethernet download solutions?

Both versions of CineStation are available with 10Gb Ethernet for the fastest possible Cine file download.  The original CineStation uses X2SR fiber for the 10Gb Connection.  The CineStation-IV comes with Gb and copper-based 10Gbase-T Ethernet by default.

For tower PCs there are 10Gb PCI-e cards available to take advantage of this, however this solution is not very ‘portable’. The best portable solution we have found is using a laptop computer with Thunderbolt, and a Thunderbolt-10Gb Ethernet converter. 

Thunderbolt is usually associated with Apple devices, such as the MacBook Pro (which works great for this with Glue Tools Séance software), however Thunderbolt can be found included on some newer Windows-based laptops, which will let you run PCC. For example, several models of the HP Z-book have Thunderbolt. 

These 10Gb-Ethernet converters are available from companies like ATTO and Sanlink (for example) and generally come with Intel-based drivers for the Windows installation.  We use the Promise Sanlink2 with a CineStation IV at the Vision Research offices.  Once the device is installed, set up the new network connection as required for 10Gb Ethernet and that’s all it takes.

The drives you use to save the data also need to be considered, as saving to USB drives will not be as fast as a Thunderbolt-based RAID drive with SSDs. Optimize the entire system for the best results.

What are the differences between a CineFlash and a CineMag?

A CineFlash drive works with most modern Miro camera models (M, LC, R, LAB) and allows the user to save data securely at a rate of approx. 85 Mpx/second.   A CineMag saves data much faster, in some cases at data rates above 1 Gpx/sec, and is available for most of our v-Series cameras.

The data saved on the CineFlash are stored as Cine files, and the CineFlash dock can be used to move the data without any proprietary software once appropriate drivers are installed.

Data saved on the CineMag is saved with no file structure, and Cine files are created on download from the camera body or compatible CineStation using software.  

CineFlash and CineDock Collapse
What are the differences between a CineFlash and a CineMag?

A CineFlash drive works with most modern Miro camera models (M, LC, R, LAB) and allows the user to save data securely at a rate of approx. 85 Mpx/second.   A CineMag saves data much faster, in some cases at data rates above 1 Gpx/sec, and is available for most of our v-Series cameras.

The data saved on the CineFlash are stored as Cine files, and the CineFlash dock can be used to move the data without any proprietary software once appropriate drivers are installed.

Data saved on the CineMag is saved with no file structure, and Cine files are created on download from the camera body or compatible CineStation using software.  

Is there a limit to the number of cine files that I can store on a CineFlash?

Of course, the size of the CineFlash may limit the number of files you can save. But, assuming all files are small, there is currently a software imposed limit of 511 files that can be saved. We are considering changing that to a higher limit. If you have a need for more than 511, let us know!

Training

Vision Research proudly offers a new program that delivers a comprehensive training solution for users of Phantom cameras. The Phantom v-Series Camera Certification Training Program is a two-tiered training program that can reduce in-house training expenses and enhance your workforces’ productivity.

Our Phantom v-Series Camera Certification Training Program helps engineers and technicians better understand Phantom cameras, as well as the use of Phantom software, accessories, and applications for high-speed imaging; that will deliver high quality technical and product education you require.

Our instructors provide an in-depth customer-focused hands-on learning experience for our Phantom products as well as the basics in photography through a combination of lectures; exercises, labs, and training solutions. Class size is limited to eight students per session to ensure that each student receives the individual attention he or she may need.

"Our Phantom v-Series Camera Certification Training Program helps engineers and technicians better understand Phantom implementations, use of Phantom software and hardware, and applications," says Frank Mazella, Chief Instructor for Vision Research," and delivers high quality technical and product education our customers' require. We believe this will allow them to maximize the use of our products and the effectiveness of their personnel.

Registration

The registration fee(s) for the Phantom Operator Certification Training Course are:

  • Phantom Operator Certification Training – Level I - $1,000 (US) per person, and

  • Phantom Operator Certification Training – Level II - $1,000 (US) per person.

Vision Research reserves the right to accept or decline registrations, and to cancel the course and return all registration fees if enrollment is insufficient. No refunds will be made to participants who fail to cancel by at least five (5) working days before the course starts. Cancellations will be charged a $200 service fee if made more than 5 working days prior to the start of the course. Substitutions may be made at any time without penalty.

If you are interested in attending, or have any question regarding the training, please contact your local Vision Research sales representative; or, use our"Contact Us" form to request more information.

Click here for a schedule of our training classes.

If you are in need of training for television or motion picture production applications, please contact AbelCine if you are in the US or Canada, or your local Phantom sales representatives worldwide.

Tutorials

Learn more about your Phantom camera with the tutorials below. You can also view all of the tutorials on YouTube at: http://bit.ly/PhantomTraining


Learn more about Phantom Rentals.

Phantom Camera Control Software Version


Vision Research Tutorial Series For PCC

Coming Soon! For PCC Tutorials

The User Interfaces (Part 1) Tutorial PCC

The User Interfaces (Part 2) Tutorial PCC

Application Preferences (Part 1) Tutorial PCC

Application Preferences (Part 2) Tutorial PCC

Capturing A Cine (Part 1) Tutorial PCC

Capturing A Cine (Part 2) Tutorial PCC

Reviewing A Cine Tutorial PCC

Editing and Saving A Cine Tutorial PCC

Saving to Flash Memory Part I (Manually Saving to Flash) Tutorial PCC

Saving to Flash Memory Part II (Auto Save to Flash) Tutorial PCC

Saving to Flash Memory Part III (Direct Recording to Phantom CineMag) Tutorial PCC
Phantom Product Families


Click on a family of cameras to begin.
User-added image
Phantom VEO Cameras
Help Documents
Phantom Features
General Documents
Technical Notes
AMECare Documents










Camera Hardware Help File, Ver v2.7
This document is the print version of the help file that accompanies PCC Ver v2.7.Camera.pdf

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Phantom RCU Help File
This document is the printed version of the RCU software documentationPhantom Remote Control.pdf

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Phantom Control Panel Help File
The Phantom Cine Control Panel utility can be used to simultaneously play multiple cine files opened via the New View button in the Phantom Camera Control, View Cine dialogue window. It allows the end user to view multiple saved cine files that were captured from multiple cameras, networked together, recording the same event from different camera angles.Phantom.pdf

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Phantom MultiCam Help File Ver 2.7
The Phantom MultiCam application is a data sheet utility that allows for the controlling of connected Phantom cameras and their corresponding cine files. It is a utility which allows the end-user to manage one or more cameras by viewing and editing parameters for recording or viewing cine files to and from the cameras integrated memory. It is mainly focused on handling acquisition and set up camera parameters with straightforward image feedback.

The Phantom MultiCam can be run as an independent software application aiming to offer easy control over connected cameras and their corresponding cine files.MultiCam.pdf

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Install Miro Dust Cap Insert Guide
This document will assist you in Installing a Miro Dust Cap insert on your Miro Airborne digital high-speed camera.VR INTERNAL_WEB-ZDOC-PRJ100-IG-001 Rev1_Miro Dust Cap Insert.pdf

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CineMag II Interface Plate Replacement
This document describes how to replace the CineMag interface pin array (MagMate connector) on compatible cameras. A spare ships with the Phantom Flex, and spares are available for other compatible cameras under VRI part number: VRI-2GA1112. Rarely, a pin can be accidentally bent or broken if a CineMag is improperly inserted. Having a spare part on hand can be a life saver.NOTES_WEB-MAGMATE Intrfce Replcmnt.pdf

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Quick Start Guide for Phantom Cameras
The Quick Start Guides in this section are designed to provide a quick introduction on using a Phantom camera with the Phantom Camera Control application, Touch-Sensitive LCD Screens, and On-Camera Control Buttons. They are intentionally kept brief so that you can start using your camera as quickly as possible. The objective of these Quick Start Guides is not to teach you every single detail of the Phantom Camera Control applications, Touch-Sensitive LCD Screens, or On-Camera Control Buttons, but familiarize you with the basic procedures necessary to use your camera.Phantom Quick Starts.pdf

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Phantom Nucleus Help File Ver v2.7
The Phantom Nucleus application allows the end user to, in one simple operation, load firmware FPGA, (Field Programmable Gate Array), Flash FPGA, CineMag, and Kernel firmware. It allows the end user to load firmware files into the selected visible camera, or in a camera which responds to a ping command, by introducing its IP address and a value for camera version.Nucleus.pdf

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Phantom Video Player Help File Ver v2.7
he Phantom Camera Control Software, and the On-Camera Control Buttons provides you with complete creative control over time. You can select any frame rate in increments of one frame per second. Shift the frame rate a little and move a scene to a slightly future viewpoint. Or shift the frame rate a lot and move a scene to some long passing moment in time. You will enjoy the ability of having seamless control of the duration, speed and time of every element of the shot.PVP.pdf

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Performing a Camera Firmware Update

This document will provide a step by step procedure for performing an update to the firmware in a Phantom camera.

Document revision: 5.

Here are several recommendations from our technicians to ensure that you have a successful firmware upgrade:

  • You should never do a firmware upgrade when running on battery power. Ensure the camera is connected to AC power.
  • You should perform the upgrade using Phantom version 692 or PCC version 692 or higher. If you do not have version 692 or higher please contact Vision Research.
  • If for some reason the firmware upgrade fails, the camera will likely need to be returned to Vision Research for service.
  • For v710 cameras, if your camera’s firmware is 670 or less, the camera needs to be returned to have the camera calibrated along with the firmware upgrade. Please contact support@visionresearch.com to arrange for an RMA.
CM-2 Performing a Firmware Upgrade_ REV_5.pdf

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PCC 2.7 Release Notes
PCC 2.7 Release NotesRelease.pdf

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